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America Rebuilds: A Year at Ground Zero
Ground Zero Profiles
Engineering the Clean-Up
Artifacts
Video Stories
Imagining the Future
Dialogue
About the Program

Assisting the Rescue
Surveying the Damage
Assessing Buildings
Navigating the PATH
Understanding the Site
Stabilizing the Wall
Removing Debris
Supporting Structures
Extracting Hazards
Uncovering Property



Quick Facts

Sources

Understanding the Site

Diagram of the WTC layout

A Bathtub With Water On the Outside

GEORGE TAMARO: Water saturates the ground around the World Trade Center site. On the western border, at the PATH train tubes, the Hudson River comes all the way up to West Street, only 150 feet away. Thus, it was necessary to construct a three-foot thick wall, known as the "bathtub", around the 11-acre area that would later house the North and South Towers, the Marriott hotel (World Trade Center 3), and the U.S. Customs House (World Trade Center 6). Known as a "slurry" wall because of the technology used to construct it, the reinforced concrete bathtub wall is about four blocks long north to south, and two blocks wide in the east-west direction.

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Image credits: Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers