Kid Sister

"It’s [Hip-Hop] like a huge self-cleaning body of water, tide rises, things get REAL— POP! Tide goes out and more Do-It-Yourself stuff gets a chance. We're in that right now." - Kid Sister

Kid Sister is a Chicago based rapper known for her eclectic sound and hard-hitting delivery. 

Photo provided by Kid Sister.


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Q&A 

Can you remember the first Hip-Hop song you ever heard and what feelings it inspired in you?

Kid Sister: I'd be lying if I failed to mention the House Party soundtrack was my first music purchase everwhich DOES in fact, rule. But, the first rap song that really moved me was "Award Tour" and I'm still addicted to it. It's a perfect song.

 

Who are the artists who have served as an inspiration to you?

Kid Sister: At the moment Lady Miss Kier, who has traditionally been very Hip-Hop adjacent, also Jamiroquai who sonically is pretty culturally ambiguous and interesting. [I've been] Listening to a lot of late 70's early 80's boogie too- Kashif, Rainbow Team, TSOP, Kleeer, Fantasy... through samples and style this is where a LOT of Hip-Hop has its roots. Over the years though I've been inspired by the usual suspects: Big, Pac, Nas, etc; the great ones. Who better to study?

 

What do you consider some of the most influential contributions made to Hip-Hop in the past 40 years?

Kid Sister: That's a lonnnnng time [laughs]. Okay here we go! In no particular order: Grand Master Flash, NWA, Public Enemy, Dre, Pac and Big, Jay and Kanye, Mobb Deep, Dead Prez, A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Jurassic 5, Mos Def, Def Jux and Rhymesayers guys, Jean Grae, Bahamadia. Those are the pillars and the smarties. Then there's all the southern rap from over the years and the Bay stuff and the new NY stuff and all the weird, fringe art stuff. Also, The Luniz and Bone will always have a special place in my heart [laughs]. There's too much to list really and I love it all.

 

How do you see Hip-Hop evolving in the next 40 years?

Kid Sister: It’s [Hip-Hop] like a huge self-cleaning body of water, tide rises, things get REAL— POP! Tide goes out and more Do It Yourself stuff gets a chance. We're in that right now. Recently all of the big, hyped up albums are failing and flailing like dead fish because the tide is out. Big budget pop music, particularly Hip-Hop isn't as important as it once was. It’s exciting to see where things will go next!

 

What do you consider your generation's greatest contributions to Hip Hop?

Kid Sister: I think we'll have to wait and see!

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