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in the footsteps of paul
 Wider World
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 Home | History | Series
 Introduction
 Tarsus (Birth - 30CE)
 Jerusalem (30-34)
 Antioch (34-43)
 Spreading the Word (43-48)
 The Wider World (49-50)
 Corinth (50-52)
 Ephesus (52-56)
 Into the Fire (56-70)
Greek Cities Today
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 Pages
123

Porch of the Carytids
Porch of the Carytids
(production still)

Zappion
Zappion
(production still)

Acropolis
Acropolis
(production still)

Temple of Hephaistos
Temple of Hephaistos
(production still)

Theater of Herodes Atticus
Theater of Herodes Atticus
(production still)

Arch of Hadrian
Arch of Hadrian
(courtesy of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein, Indiana University, Bloomington)

Olympeion
Olympeion
(courtesy of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein, Indiana University, Bloomington)

Acropolis
Acropolis
(courtesy of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein, Indiana University, Bloomington)

Acropolis
Acropolis
(courtesy of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein, Indiana University, Bloomington)

Agora
Agora
(courtesy of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein, Indiana University, Bloomington)


t
he city of Philippi is laid out along the Via Egnatia, large sections of which still survive. The site gives a clear impression of the layout of a Roman colony, with a forum, theater, and baths. The site also illustrates how building materials were commonly reused over the years as city priorities shifted. Sections of a market and palaestra were recycled into a sixth century Basilica, and the pre-Roman acropolis is fortified with medieval walls. There is also a small structure called "St.Paul's Prison."

Modern Thessaloniki is a city of around 400,000 residents. The Via Egnatia runs through the city center, and the grid pattern of the modern city dates from the Roman period as well. Excavations include a forum and theater. The many churches of Thessaloniki demonstrate the various fortunes of Christian sects over the centuries. Monuments to the third century emperor Galerius include the Arch of Galerius and his palace. Relevant museums include the Archeological Museum, the Museum of Byzantine Culture, and the Thessaloniki Center of Jewish Historical Culture.

Many of the monuments Paul would have seen in Athens, as well as the markets where he would have sought converts, and the Areopagus where he presented his case to the philosophers, have been excavated, preserved, or reconstructed over time. The reconstructed Stoa of Attalus in the Agora evokes the buildings represented by the many foundations throughout the excavations. The Parthenon, built 447-438 BCE, is a vivid example of how time and history affect a monuments survival. The reliefs from the temple are dispersed in museums in Greece and throughout Europe. The most famous of these is the Parthenon Frieze in the British Museum in London. On site on the Acropolis, the roof of the Parthenon remained intact until 1687 when it was blown up while being used as a powder magazine. The city underwent a building boom under the Emperor Hadrian in the second century, so some of the most intact structures, such as the Temple of Olympian Zeus, post-date Paul's visit. As would be expected, the city is host to numerous museums that document all periods of over 5000 years of Greek history. It is important to imagine many of the statues as Paul would likely have seen them -- lavishly decorated with paint and jewels. The harbor city Piraeus also features some excavations, and sections of the defense walls remain.

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