Try Portobello au Poivre for Dinner

Portobello au Poivre is a lighter, vegetarian version of Steak au Poivre made with a portobello mushroom steak.

Portobello au Poivre is a lighter, vegetarian version of Steak au Poivre made with a portobello mushroom steak.

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Steak au Poivre is a French classic which literally means “pepper steak” and is usually made with a steak that’s covered in a cream and pepper pan-sauce. If you feel like going vegetarian, or just feel like something a little lighter, it’s also just as good made with a portobello mushroom steak.

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Have Banana Bread Pancakes for Breakfast

Banana Bread Pancakes are essentially a quick bread that is easy to throw together for a weekend breakfast.

Banana Bread Pancakes are essentially a quick bread that is easy to throw together for a weekend breakfast.

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Pancakes! My favorite thing to make on the weekends. I’ve been frantically been getting everything ready for this upcoming busy season. It’s been a big ol’ mess but also a lot of fun. Autumn is finally here and I feel like we should celebrate with someone that’s not only easy to throw together but very very cozy…banana bread pancakes!

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Make Honey Paprika Chicken

Honey Paprika Chicken is a sweet and savory weeknight dinner that you can make in 10 minutes.

Honey Paprika Chicken is a sweet and savory weeknight dinner that you can make in 10 minutes.

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This is one of those easy backup entrées to keep in mind for those weeknights when you’re craving some sweet and savory fried chicken goodness but don’t feel like getting out the fryer. It only requires a handful of ingredients and about 10 minutes of your time. Your reward is an addictively good chicken that’s glazed with caramelized honey and smoked paprika, and just a hint of refreshing tartness from the lemon juice.

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Serve a Cheesy Heirloom Tomato Tart

This Cheesy Heirloom Tomato Tart is a simple dish with cheese and onions.

This Cheesy Heirloom Tomato Tart is a simple dish with cheese and onions.

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Tomatoes at the market are going crazy right now and I’m taking full advantage. This recipe was inspired by The Pioneer Woman’s tomato tart. It just looked too beautiful not to give it a whirl.

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Serve Kung Pao Shrimp for Dinner

Shrimp takes a turn in a twist on the Chinese-American takeout classic of Kung Pao Chicken for a weeknight meal that comes together in 15 minutes.

Shrimp takes a turn in a twist on the Chinese-American takeout classic of Kung Pao Chicken for a weeknight meal that comes together in 15 minutes.

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This delicious take on the Chinese-American takeout classic using shrimp instead of chicken for a weeknight meal that comes together in about 15 minutes. Like all stir-fry recipes, Kung Pao Shrimp requires a bit of prep work, but once your mis-en-place is done, it only takes about 5 minutes to cook. That’s why it’s very important to have everything prepped and ready before you start stir-frying, or some your dish will get overcooked/burnt.

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Serve Clams Over Zucchini Linguine

Zucchini Linguine is a simple weeknight pasta meal featuring clams and Pecorino Romano.

Zucchini Linguine is a simple weeknight pasta meal featuring clams and Pecorino Romano.

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In a few days it’s National Linguine Day. Whenever I hear that’s it’s so-and-so national food day, my first thought is, Who picks these days?! Is there a committee somewhere, in a room, just strategizing which days should be national food holidays? I like to think that it might be the most fun job ever. They can’t hire me for the job because I would make every single day: National Corgi Day or National Let’s Eat Pizza Day or National Doughnut Day. I would not offer enough variety.

Zucchini Linguine is a simple weeknight pasta meal featuring clams and Pecorino Romano.

But today, we’re sticking with the scheduled program. We’re exploring good ol’ National Linguine Day with a twist of an old classic. I’ve been trying to eat a little bit healthier lately so I wanted to make a slightly healthier slant on classic linguine.

Zucchini Linguine is a simple weeknight pasta meal featuring clams and Pecorino Romano.

I’m doing so by adding some zucchini because we all have so much of it right now and I’m using whole wheat pasta instead of regular pasta, which I love.

 

And just for some good balance, I added a bit of Pecorino Romano because we need flavor!

Zucchini Linguine is a simple weeknight pasta meal featuring clams and Pecorino Romano.

Zucchini Linguine with Clams

Zucchini Linguine with Clams

Zucchini Linguine is a simple weeknight pasta meal featuring clams and Pecorino Romano. (Recipe Credit: Adrianna Adarme of Fresh Tastes)

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Ingredients

  • Salt
  • Olive oil 
  • 3 small zucchini (sliced or shaved or spiralized)
  • 3 scallions, minced
  • 1/2 pound little neck clams 
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons of butter 
  • Juice and zest from 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 cup grated Pecorino cheese, divided
  • 1 tablespoon minced flat-leaf Italian parsley
  • 1/2 pound whole wheat pasta
  • 1 tablespoon minced chervil (or tarragon)

Directions

  1. Start by bringing a medium pot filled with salted water to a boil. Cook your pasta according to your package’s directions, until al dente. When done, drain and immediately return to the pot. Drizzle in a teaspoon of olive oil and toss (this will eliminate sticking). Cover the pot and set aside. 
  2. In a medium saute pan, add a teaspoon or two of olive oil. When glistening, add the zucchini, scallions, clams, pinch of salt and crushed red pepper; cover the pan and cook until the clams open up and the zucchini is soft, about 5 to 6 minutes. Discard any clams that haven’t opened. Mix in the butter, juice and zest from 1/2 lemon, 1/4 cup of the Pecorino cheese and parsley. Toss together until combined. Add to the pot with the pasta and toss. Give it a taste and adjust the salt according to taste. Top with some freshly chopped chervil and divide amongst bowls. Serve immediately

Yield: 2-4 servings


Adrianna Adarme - PBS Food Fresh Tastes BloggerAdrianna Adarme is a food blogger and author living in Los Angeles, California. She writes the blog A Cozy Kitchen, where she shares comforting, everyday recipes from her kitchen. She recently authored her first cookbook, PANCAKES: 72 Sweet and Savory Recipes for the Perfect Stack. She’s a lover of breakfast, pie (and sometimes even pie for breakfast), corgis and cute things. You can find her on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook.

Make Butter Soy Sauce Smashed Potatoes

Smashed Potatoes recipe creates conduits for the butter soy sauce flavors to enter when cooking.

Smashed Potatoes recipe creates conduits for the butter soy sauce flavors to enter when cooking.

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Potatoes are terrible at picking up liquid seasonings. That’s why things like home fries are usually just seasoning with powdered salt and spices. The problem is that the potato skins block liquid seasonings from entering into the potato. Even if you cut them into cubes, the waxy flesh of the potato tends to ward off any liquids until they get crisp. That’s why I like to boil and smash my potatoes before pan-frying them.

Smashed Potatoes recipe creates conduits for the butter soy sauce flavors to enter when cooking.

By smashing whole small potatoes flat, it creates conduits for your seasoning to enter. It’s the same reason why you squish the sides of a baked potato before you add your butter and other condiments.

The other benefit of smashing potatoes is that potatoes are round, which means they make very little contact with the surface of the pan when you try to brown them. By flattening them, it greatly increases the contact patch with the pan, allowing you to get the skins nice and crisp!

Smashed Potatoes recipe creates conduits for the butter soy sauce flavors to enter when cooking.

I suppose the only drawback of this method is that depending on the type of potatoes you use, their ability to hold themselves together can vary. I’ve found that waxy potatoes like small red skinned and purple skinned ones tend to work the best, but starchier potatoes like these tend to absorb the butter and soy sauce flavors better, so it’s a trade-off. Smashed potatoes aren’t going to win any beauty pageants, but given the choice between beautiful and tasty, I’d pick tasty any day.

As for the flavor combo, the butter, along with a drizzle of soy sauce at the end is truly a match made in heaven: nutty, savory and loaded with umami. This also works really well with duck fat, or olive oil along with some herbs and aromatics like rosemary and garlic.

Smashed Potatoes recipe creates conduits for the butter soy sauce flavors to enter when cooking.

Butter Soy Sauce Smashed Potatoes

Butter Soy Sauce Smashed Potatoes Recipe

Smashing whole potatoes create entry points for seasoning to enter when cooking them. (Recipe Credit: Marc Matsumoto of Fresh Tastes)

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Ingredients

  • 450 grams small potatoes
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

Directions

  1. Scrub the potatoes well and then put them in a pot with enough water to cover the potatoes by an inch. Generously salt the water and then boil the potatoes until they are tender when you insert a toothpick or fork. Drain the potatoes and let the skins dry out a bit.
  2. Place the potatoes on a flat surface and use the bottom of a plate to smash them so they are about two-thirds of their original thickness.
  3. Melt the butter in a frying pan and add the smashed potatoes. Fry on one side until golden brown and then flip and fry the other side.
  4. When the second side is golden and crisp, drizzle the soy sauce evenly over the potatoes and flip them once to coat evenly. They are done when all the liquid has evaporated and the potatoes are coated with a crisp crust of caramelized soy sauce.

Yield: 4 servings (as a side dish)


Marc Matsumoto is the food blogger behind Fresh TastesMarc Matsumoto is a culinary consultant and recipe repairman who shares his passion for good food through his website norecipes.com. For Marc, food is a life long journey of exploration, discovery and experimentation and he shares his escapades through his blog in the hopes that he inspires others to find their own culinary adventures. Marc’s been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today, and has made multiple appearances on NPR and the Food Network.

Make Late Summer Succotash with Mustard Greens

This is the simplest of succotashes with a nice addition of mustard greens with tons of zucchini and lima beans and tomatoes galore.

This is the simplest of succotashes with a nice addition of mustard greens with tons of zucchini and lima beans and tomatoes galore.

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Summer is on its last breath. Does that sound dismal? I don’t mean it to be! I love the end of summer. That’s when all of my favorite things are around in full force. Think tons of zucchini and lima beans and tomatoes galore. I eat all of these things on a daily basis in late summer.

This is the simplest of succotashes with a nice addition of mustard greens with tons of zucchini and lima beans and tomatoes galore.

This is the simplest of succotashes with a nice addition of mustard greens; they give it a good flavor note.

This is the simplest of succotashes with a nice addition of mustard greens with tons of zucchini and lima beans and tomatoes galore.

You can serve this succotash with all sorts of things. Think a piece of fish or a piece of chicken breast. Or even you can put all of this in between a good tortilla and add some hot sauce. OR, serve it for breakfast with a side of fried eggs. It’s the ultimate, throw-everything-into-a-pan-and-cook-it-up type of meal, which is exactly what I’m looking for when it comes to late-summer time.

This is the simplest of succotashes with a nice addition of mustard greens with tons of zucchini and lima beans and tomatoes galore.

Late Summer Succotash with Mustard Greens

Late Summer Succotash with Mustard Greens recipe

This simple, summer succotash features zucchini, lima beans and tomatoes. (Recipe Credit: Adrianna Adarme of Fresh Tastes)

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Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil 
  • 1 red bell pepper, destemmed and diced 
  • 1 zucchini
  • 1/2 pint cherry tomatoes
  • Salt
  • 2 ears of corn
  • 2 green onion sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 2 tablespoons minced Italian parsley 
  • 1 1/2 cup lima beans (fresh or frozen) 
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon 
  • Black pepper 
  • Sesame seeds
  • 1 bunch of mustard greens, loosely chopped

Directions

  1. In a medium saute pan, set over medium-high heat, add the olive oil. When the oil glistens, add the red bell pepper, zucchini and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until the zucchini has slight color. Add the cherry tomatoes and stir and cook for about 1 minute. Next add the corn, green onions, garlic cloves, Italian parsley and cook for about 2 to 3 minutes.
  2. Lastly, add the lima beans, lemon juice, a few turns of black pepper, a sprinkling of sesame seeds and mustard greens. Cover the pot for about 1 to 2 minutes (this will help soften the mustard greens). Uncover, give it a stir and add salt to taste). Divide amongst bowls and serve.

Adrianna Adarme - PBS Food Fresh Tastes BloggerAdrianna Adarme is a food blogger and author living in Los Angeles, California. She writes the blog A Cozy Kitchen, where she shares comforting, everyday recipes from her kitchen. She recently authored her first cookbook, PANCAKES: 72 Sweet and Savory Recipes for the Perfect Stack. She’s a lover of breakfast, pie (and sometimes even pie for breakfast), corgis and cute things. You can find her on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook.

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