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Harriman Expedition Retraced

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Kristine Crossen

Geologist


Kristine Crossen

Kristine Crossen
Kristine Crossen became fascinated with glaciers when she moved to Alaska in 1969. "I lived in the Alaskan bush, near the southern boundary of Denali National Park, from 1973 to 1975. The tall mountains and broad glacial valleys where I hiked, snowshoed, and snowmachined gave me a strong appreciation of a glacier's power over the landscape."

Crossen says the best way to learn about glaciers is to "visit them, to see, touch and walk on the glacial ice." Accessible glaciers in Alaska include the Exit Glacier near Seward, the Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, and the Portage and Matanuska Glaciers near Anchorage. The beautiful Portage Glacier, near Anchorage is one of the main tourist attractions in Alaska. It is visited by a half million people every year.

Crossen is the chair of the Geology Department at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. Her recent research involves a comparison of fifteen terrestrial and tidewater glaciers during the past 200 years. She has specialized in glacial marine sedimentation of the Ice Age, glacial and Pleistocene geology, geomorphology, the geology of Alaska, and Alaskan glaciers. She recommends Living Ice, by Robert P. Sharp and After the Ice Age, by E.E. Pielou for further reading. She has written articles on such topics as the neoglacial history of the Portage Glacier and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition and human occupation of the central Tanana Valley of interior Alaska.


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For information on the Harriman Retraced Expedition e-mail: harriman2001@science.smith.edu

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