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Planting a Balled-and-burlapped Tree

 

Garden with Water Feature



Lawn & Garden

Terms In Alphabetical Listings:

Acid Soil
Aeration
Alkaline Soil
Alpine
Annual
Balled-and-burlapped
Bare Root
Biennial
Compost
Container-grown
Cool-season
Cover Crop
Crabgrass
Crown Rot
Deadhead
Deciduous
Divide
Double-dig
Edging
Evergreen
Frost Heave
Gall
Harden Off
Hardiness
Hardpan
Hedge
Herbicide

Insecticide
Landscape Fabric
Lime
Loam
Mowing Strip
Mulch
Organic Fertilizer
Perennial
Pinch
Plug
Pre-emergent
Propagate
Rock Garden
Shear
Shrub
Snow Mold
Soil Compaction
Soil pH
Sprig
Stake
Sun Scald
Synthetic Fertilizer
Till
Warm-season
Weed
Winterkill
Zone


Acid Soil
Soil with a pH level lower than 7. Back to alphabetical list


Aeration
The process of pulling small plugs (about " wide and 3" long) from the turf to relieve compacted soil and allow water and nutrients to reach roots. Back to alphabetical list


Alkaline Soil
Soil with a pH higher than 7. Back to alphabetical list


Alpine
In gardening, plants native to northern mountain regions. Back to alphabetical list


Annual
A plant that grows from seed, blooms, sets seed, and dies in one growing season. Back to alphabetical list


Balled-and-burlapped
A tree or shrub that has been field grown then dug up for sale. Its rootball is wrapped in burlap for transport. Because roots are cut when the plant is dug up, balled-and-burlapped plants should be pruned when planted. Back to alphabetical list


Bare Root
A plant, shrub, or tree that is field grown, dug up when dormant, and shipped with its roots exposed. Must be "sweated" prior to planting to help break dormancy. Back to alphabetical list


Biennial
A plant with a two-year life cycle, it blooms and sets seed in the second year. Back to alphabetical list


Compost
The process by which organic materials actively decay into a nutrient-rich humus. Back to alphabetical list


Container-grown
Plants, trees, and shrubs grown for sale in containers. Plants left in containers too long are often root-bound. Back to alphabetical list


Cool-season
Those plants, especially vegetables and annuals, that do best in cool weather. Back to alphabetical list


Cover Crop
A crop such as clover or winter wheat, sown between planting seasons to help retain soil, keep down weeds, and enrich the soil. Cover crops are tilled under in the spring. Back to alphabetical list


Crabgrass
An annual grassy weed that spreads mainly by seed. Can be controlled by good mowing practices to prevent its going to seed and application of preemergent herbicide in late spring. Back to alphabetical list


Crown Rot
A wet rot that occurs at the base, or crown, of the plant. Caused by bacteria or fungus and exacerbated by overcrowding and excess moisture. Back to alphabetical list


Deadhead
Removal of spent blooms to improve appearance and/or prevent seed formation. Promotes bushy growth and prolonged flowering of annuals. Back to alphabetical list


Deciduous
Trees and shrubs that shed their leaves annually. Back to alphabetical list


Divide
To dig up a plant, usually perennial, and split it into two or more smaller plants preserving some of the roots and top growth in each new plant. Back to alphabetical list


Double-dig
A method of soil preparation in which trenches 8- to 9-inches deep are dug side by side. The soil removed from the first trench is reserved to fill the last trench. As each trench is opened, the soil below it is loosened and amended. Soil from the each successive trench is used to fill the previous trench. Back to alphabetical list


Edging
A border at the edge of a garden to prevent weeds from creeping into it. Typically incorporates a physical barrier of plastic, wood, or brick, although traditionally it was simply a base strip cut along the edge of the garden with an edging tool. Back to alphabetical list


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