Good Night, and Good Luck

Versión en español abajo

What is it that journalism needs? That the people can put their trust in it; many years have gone by since journalism was invented to communicate in a better way among those living in a common place, whether it be a neighborhood, town, city, country, or world.

Furthermore it must be said that journalism has been converted into spectacle. Journalism has become selfishly motivated, converting its’ own journalists into celebrities, into “newsmakers” themselves, James Bond types who reveal the truth, or, like Indiana Jones, seeking adventures in far-off lands that, from the perspective of first-world marketing, seem intriguingly exotic.

The media is faced with the disparity between being spokespersons shedding light on a subject with clarity, with the possibility of giving information, versus the problems they may have maintaining their superstar reporter and their supporting cast, making news reports that don’t interfere with the interests of their advertisers, who are the ones paying the bills.

The problem is that consumers are buying fewer and fewer print-edition news sources, and they no longer have the illusion of absolute authority when they are watching television. That phrase which was so common in former years, “it’s true, I saw it on the TV”, is heard less and less; journalism continues to garner the type of attention that spectacle deserves, but there should be no confusion between the two. It is an imperious human necessity to know at least what is going on in town…or in the world.

Journalists are not called to sell a product, but rather a values-based series; the possibility of reporting to improve the quality of life in communities, whether the focus be on understanding diversity or meeting and communicating with others. Journalistic notes are not aseptic; if the large network chains are obsessed with producing spectacles, the community media should return to its origins and be a public service, a source for truthseeking at all costs; this is what the public needs, our neighbors, our students, and our friends.

It is not acceptable that journalism exists to be simply the bell that tolls when there is a death, a school shooting, a fire, or a celebrity scandal; journalism is meant to be analytical, honestly concerned with the the welfare of the majority and responsible for minority perspectives.

Journalism must get physically closer to the people and leave the viewer ratings to one side; we as community reporters must also concern ourselves with the quality of information we provide, though it be only to a handful of people.

Since I came to know the history of the investigative journalist and documentarist Edward R. Murrow, a tireless advocate of the power of communications media and reformer of television broadcasting, I believe in this type of real journalism, and the truth is that now only a very few journalists show the type of unbreakable compromise and commitment of he and his colleagues in that period.

So, to use his words as a call to reclaim our swiftly eroding journalistic integrity,

Good night, and good luck.

¿Qué es lo que el periodisma necesita ?, que la gente pueda confiar en él, desde hace ya varios años que el periodismo dejó de hacerse para poder comunicar de mejor manera a quienes habitan un lugar, ya sea un barrio, un pueblo, una ciudad, un país, el mundo.
Demás está decir que el periodismo se ha convertido en espectáculo, no es por nada que el periodismo se reportea así mismo, convirtiendo en estrellas, en noticia, a sus propios periodistas, especies de James Bond que develarán la verdad o Indiana Jones, buscando aventuras en lejanos parajes que, desde la mirada del marketing del primer mundo, parecieran extravagantes o llenos de aventuras.
Los medios de comunicación siguen enfrentándose a las disquisiciones entre ser portavoces de una luz de claridad, de la posibilidad de información, versus, los problemas que deben tener para sostener a sus “estrellas”, o a sus estructuras, dando a conocer noticias que no entorpezcan los intereses de sus anunciantes, que son los que pagan sus facturas.
Sin embargo, es ese el problema, ya menos y menos consumen los periódicos impresos, y tampoco los habitantes del globo siguen conservando esa imagen de probidad absoluta cuando ven la television. La frase tan válida en años anteriores “es cierto, salió en la tele”, es cada vez menos, y menos escuchada, el periodismo sigue concibiendo esa atención que merece el espectáculo, pero que no se puede confundir con él, es la necesidad imperiosa del ser humano de enterarse de, al menos, lo que pasa en el barrio…..o en el mundo.
Los periodistas no están llamados a entregar un producto, sino una serie de valores, la posibilidad de informar para mejorar la vida de las comunidades, ya sea en el entendimiento de la diversidad, en la posibilidad de encuentro y comunicación, las notas periodísticas no son un producto acéptico, si ya las grandes cadenas se encuentran preocupadas por el producto del espectáculo, creo que los medios comunitarios deben volver a su origen, ser un servicio, una posibilidad de probidad, buscar la verdad cueste lo que cueste, eso es lo que quiere el público, nuestros vecinos, nuestros estudiantes y amigos.
No es posible que el periodismo sea sólo una campana que suene cuando hay un muerto, un tiroteo en una escuela, un incendio o un escándalo de las estrellas políticas o las de Hollywood, el periodismo es la posibilidad de análisis y copromiso con el bien de la mayoría y la responsabilidad con las minorías.
El periodismo necesita acercarse a la gente y dejar el viewer rating a un lado y quizás los comunicadores comunitarios debemos de preocuparnos de la calidad de nuestra información aunque sólo llegue a un puñado de personas.
Desde que conocí la historia de Edward R. Murrow, creo que en el periodismo actual, muy pocos muestran ese compromiso inquebrantable con sus compañeros de epoca.

Buenas noches y Buena suerte.

Check out Idea Lab Sponsorship opportunities!

Newsletters

MediaShift delivers the best news on media and technology directly to your in-box.

Stay Informed

Get Idea Lab Daily via Email

Follow us on Social

Who we Are

Idea Lab is a group blog by innovative thinkers and entrepreneurs who are reinventing media in the digital age.

Good night, and good luck.

Versión en español abajo

What is it that journalism needs? That the people can put their trust in it; many years have gone by since journalism was invented to communicate in a better way among those living in a common place, whether it be a neighborhood, town, city, country, or world.

Furthermore it must be said that journalism has been converted into spectacle. Journalism has become selfishly motivated, converting its’ own journalists into celebrities, into “newsmakers” themselves, James Bond types who reveal the truth, or, like Indiana Jones, seeking adventures in far-off lands that, from the perspective of first-world marketing, seem intriguingly exotic.

The media is faced with the disparity between being spokespersons shedding light on a subject with clarity, with the possibility of giving information, versus the problems they may have maintaining their superstar reporter and their supporting cast, making news reports that don’t interfere with the interests of their advertisers, who are the ones paying the bills.

The problem is that consumers are buying fewer and fewer print-edition news sources, and they no longer have the illusion of absolute authority when they are watching television. That phrase which was so common in former years, “it’s true, I saw it on the TV”, is heard less and less; journalism continues to garner the type of attention that spectacle deserves, but there should be no confusion between the two. It is an imperious human necessity to know at least what is going on in town…or in the world.

Journalists are not called to sell a product, but rather a values-based series; the possibility of reporting to improve the quality of life in communities, whether the focus be on understanding diversity or meeting and communicating with others. Journalistic notes are not aseptic; if the large network chains are obsessed with producing spectacles, the community media should return to its origins and be a public service, a source for truthseeking at all costs; this is what the public needs, our neighbors, our students, and our friends.

It is not acceptable that journalism exists to be simply the bell that tolls when there is a death, a school shooting, a fire, or a celebrity scandal; journalism is meant to be analytical, honestly concerned with the the welfare of the majority and responsible for minority perspectives.

Journalism must get physically closer to the people and leave the viewer ratings to one side; we as community reporters must also concern ourselves with the quality of information we provide, though it be only to a handful of people.

Since I came to know the history of the investigative journalist and documentarist Edward R. Murrow, a tireless advocate of the power of communications media and reformer of television broadcasting, I believe in this type of real journalism, and the truth is that now only a very few journalists show the type of unbreakable compromise and commitment of he and his colleagues in that period.

So, to use his words as a call to reclaim our swiftly eroding journalistic integrity,

Good night, and good luck.

¿Qué es lo que el periodisma necesita ?, que la gente pueda confiar en él, desde hace ya varios años que el periodismo dejó de hacerse para poder comunicar de mejor manera a quienes habitan un lugar, ya sea un barrio, un pueblo, una ciudad, un país, el mundo.
Demás está decir que el periodismo se ha convertido en espectáculo, no es por nada que el periodismo se reportea así mismo, convirtiendo en estrellas, en noticia, a sus propios periodistas, especies de James Bond que develarán la verdad o Indiana Jones, buscando aventuras en lejanos parajes que, desde la mirada del marketing del primer mundo, parecieran extravagantes o llenos de aventuras.
Los medios de comunicación siguen enfrentándose a las disquisiciones entre ser portavoces de una luz de claridad, de la posibilidad de información, versus, los problemas que deben tener para sostener a sus “estrellas”, o a sus estructuras, dando a conocer noticias que no entorpezcan los intereses de sus anunciantes, que son los que pagan sus facturas.
Sin embargo, es ese el problema, ya menos y menos consumen los periódicos impresos, y tampoco los habitantes del globo siguen conservando esa imagen de probidad absoluta cuando ven la television. La frase tan válida en años anteriores “es cierto, salió en la tele”, es cada vez menos, y menos escuchada, el periodismo sigue concibiendo esa atención que merece el espectáculo, pero que no se puede confundir con él, es la necesidad imperiosa del ser humano de enterarse de, al menos, lo que pasa en el barrio…..o en el mundo.
Los periodistas no están llamados a entregar un producto, sino una serie de valores, la posibilidad de informar para mejorar la vida de las comunidades, ya sea en el entendimiento de la diversidad, en la posibilidad de encuentro y comunicación, las notas periodísticas no son un producto acéptico, si ya las grandes cadenas se encuentran preocupadas por el producto del espectáculo, creo que los medios comunitarios deben volver a su origen, ser un servicio, una posibilidad de probidad, buscar la verdad cueste lo que cueste, eso es lo que quiere el público, nuestros vecinos, nuestros estudiantes y amigos.
No es posible que el periodismo sea sólo una campana que suene cuando hay un muerto, un tiroteo en una escuela, un incendio o un escándalo de las estrellas políticas o las de Hollywood, el periodismo es la posibilidad de análisis y copromiso con el bien de la mayoría y la responsabilidad con las minorías.
El periodismo necesita acercarse a la gente y dejar el viewer rating a un lado y quizás los comunicadores comunitarios debemos de preocuparnos de la calidad de nuestra información aunque sólo llegue a un puñado de personas.
Desde que conocí la historia de Edward R. Murrow, creo que en el periodismo actual, muy pocos muestran ese compromiso inquebrantable con sus compañeros de epoca.

Buenas noches y Buena suerte.

Newsletters

Best of Idea Lab

Who we Are