Andrew Whitacre

by Andrew Whitacre

This infographic from Floor Gem blasts the Transportation Security Administration’s prodigious terribleness (prodigious in the sense that the TSA is a terribleness prodigy, on the level of Bobby Fischer and chess). There’s nothing that inherently lends this data to the infographic form. It’s flawed. There’s nothing that that the graphicality adds to the data. But, […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

The MIT Technology Review recently posted an article titled, “Campaigns to Track Voters with ‘Political Cookies.” It freaks me out for a reason I’ll get to below. From Technology Review: The technology involves matching a person’s web identity with information gathered about that person offline, including his or her party registration, voting history, charitable donations, […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

In my nearly four years here at the MIT Center for Civic Media, I’ve seen the rise of some great solutions to communications challenges. MailChimp and other email marketing platforms have made signing up and emailing friends and followers dead simple while avoiding the worst practices that lead to spamhood. Twitter not only works as […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

For those who may not know, we at the MIT Center for Civic Media have doubled down on our events schedule. In addition to co-hosting events with other groups around MIT as we have the last few years, we now have two major event series: Civic Media Sessions and Civic Lunches. The latter is an […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

This post was authored by Matthew Hockenberry, who co-created Sourcemap as a visiting scientist with the MIT Center for Civic Media. Sourcemap Knowing where things come from is a fundamental part of humanity. Things are very different when they come from different places. The provenance of a work tells us the importance of not only […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

One of the things we at MIT are very quietly considering — quietly in the same sense that I first considered getting a creative writing degree, as in, seduced by the prospect while overawed by the reality — is holding a large, public civic media conference as part of, or in addition to, our invitation-only […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media redoubled its public events efforts this past year, thanks to a push by its fellow Ethan Zuckerman. Zuckerman brings a unique perspective — a civic one — to media developments so often dominated by politics and business-model debates. This approach couldn’t be more evident than in the case of […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

With a redoubled focus on the community in the civic media community, the Center for Future Civic Media at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) launched a new series last week. These relaxed, informal conversations about civic media featured ground-level practitioners, activists, hackers, and local leaders. The first session, “Bustling with Information: Cities, Code, and […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

Last Friday, MIT Center for Future Civic Media’s director Chris Csikszentmihalyi formally released extrAct, a suite of Internet-based databasing, mapping and communications technologies for use by communities impacted by natural gas development. extrAct is targeted not only at communities and landowners but also at the journalists who cover local development and environment issues. It is […] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

Though we were the top winner in the inaugural Knight News Challenge back in 2007, MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media took as our mandate something rather “un-news”: Applying our tech expertise to information needs, broadly defined, rather than what we’d traditionally call news. This focus has had a big impact on the kind of […] more »