Christopher Csikszentmihályi

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

As we wind the way toward the end of our four year grant, I thought it would be nice to describe some of what we’ve learned at MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media (C4). In the coming weeks, I will call on a few of our researchers to offer similar blog reflections on our unique [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

For the last several months, we have been testing a system called Lost in Boston: REALTIME with a variety of community partners. This video describes a bit about the project. Rick Borovoy loves Boston, but he hates how hard it is to figure out where one is. Boston is tough to navigate, and while our [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

Last week I wrote about another project that’s come to a boil at the Center for Future Civic Media: VoIP Drupal. Here is a brief video of Leo Burd lecturing at DrupalCon 2011 on the release of Voip Drupal, a plugin that allow full interaction between Drupal CMS and phones. VoIP Drupal is a project [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

Rick Borovoy just released the Junkyard Jumbotron project, which allows laptops or phones in close proximity to be ganged together to form a large display. The Junkyard Jumbotron requires no special software; it is simply a web page that receives real-time updates from our server, allowing scrolling, zooming, and soon video. Like all software at [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media has done a variety of breakthrough civic systems with phones. Examples range from Leo Burd’s What’s Up platform to the Call4Action class and its cool student projects. We at C4 love these projects, but working with phones has always been a bear. A lot of programming is necessary. In [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

The information activist community has been rushing to respond to the Haitian earthquake. What I find remarkable is the capacity that has been built up in the last few years; from software standards, like the pfif standard generated after Katrina, to early systems like the Ushahidi engine designed during the Kenyan election violence, to larger [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

I had not planned on attending O’Reilly’s Gov2.0 conference, which is an exposition and dialog about new forms of government and information technology. But at last week’s Foo Camp (another O’Reilly event) I met a number of people in the field, and I became pretty excited with what I heard. For example, I attended a [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

Last June we held our Future of News & Future Civic Media conference, here at MIT, with many recipients of the Knight News Challenge meeting, speaking, and demoing their work. We chose to use the “barcamp” un-conference technique for most of the sessions, where all participants to the conference were able to host a session. [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

One of the central shifts implicit in user-generated information is that in many cases the user will be closer to the subject than a reporter may have been. Journalists, like ethnographers or consultants, are separated from their subjects by factors like structures of reward (salary) and professional codes (organized skepticism, systematic disinterestedness). These factors are [...] more »

by Christopher Csikszentmihályi

I’ve written before about the extrACT suite of software tools we have been developing at MIT: information and communication technologies that promote community collective action. We have started to introduce the first of these tools, Landman Report Card, to communities in Texas and Ohio that are being confronted by the impacts of natural gas extraction. [...] more »