David Ardia

by David Ardia

Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society and the Center for Sustainable Journalism at Kennesaw State University are co‐hosting a conference on September 25, 2010 in Atlanta entitled “Media Law in the Digital Age: The Rules Have Changed, Have You?“ Designed for journalists, bloggers, and lawyers who work with media clients, the conference will be an opportunity to learn […] more »

by David Ardia

Back in October, the Federal Trade Commission published a set of “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”  The FTC Guidelines call for bloggers, Tweeters, Facebook users, and certain other online publishers to disclose any “material connections” they have with companies whose products or services they endorse.  The FTC Guidelines, which went […] more »

by David Ardia

As part of the Citizen Media Law Project’s legal guide series on documenting public proceedings and events, today we published a guide to Live-Blogging and Tweeting from Court.  Over the past year, we’ve published guides addressing how to stay out of legal trouble while documenting activities at polling places and covering the Presidential Inauguration, as […] more »

by David Ardia

I am delighted to announce the public launch of the Berkman Center’s Online Media Legal Network (OMLN), a new pro bono initiative that connects lawyers and law school clinics from across the country with online journalists and digital media creators who need legal help. Lawyers participating in OMLN will provide qualifying online publishers with pro […] more »

by David Ardia

Spring is upon us and with it comes commencement season at universities across the country (Harvard’s 358th commencement is this Thursday, FYI). This is a tough time for graduates in almost every discipline, but especially so for journalism grads. At least that is the conventional wisdom. Which is why it is so refreshing to see […] more »

by David Ardia

The Citizen Media Law Project, which I direct, today launched a new page that aggregates everything on our site relating to section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (“Section 230”), the important federal statute that protects operators of websites and other interactive computer services from liability for publishing the statements of third-parties. We’ve also added […] more »

by David Ardia

In a case involving important First Amendment rights, the Citizen Media Law Project joined a number of media and advocacy organizations, including Gannett Co., Inc., Hearst Corporation, Illinois Press Association, Online News Association, Public Citizen, Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, and Tribune Company, in asking an Illinois appellate court to protect the rights […] more »

by David Ardia

Heading to Washington, D.C., to attend the Presidential Inauguration? You’re bringing your camera with you, right? Well it shouldn’t come as any surprise that heightened security measures across the Washington area will affect where you can go, what you can bring with you, and what you can do to cover the inaugural events. In an […] more »

by David Ardia

After a year of study, countless meetings, and at least two conferences, a team of researchers at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society have released a series of papers exploring the potential and challenges of the emerging networked digital media environment (note: I played a small role in this work). If you are sitting […] more »

by David Ardia

Yesterday, I read an article in the New York Times describing the fears some voters in Duval County, Florida have that their early votes will be lost and never counted. I found the article deeply disturbing. It wasn’t because it surprised me that people fear their votes won’t be counted (that fear has some precedent […] more »