David Ardia

by David Ardia

Here is a simple, but often ignored, truth: if you publish online, whether it’s a news article, blog post, podcast, video, or even a user comment, you open yourself up to potential legal liability. It doesn’t matter whether you are a professional journalist, hockey-mom, or an obscure blogger, if you post it, you’ll need to [...] more »

by David Ardia

Today, we are launching the final sections of the Citizen Media Law Project’s online guide to media law covering the risks associated with publishing online, including defamation and privacy law.  (You can read the press release here.)  The free online guide, which is intended for use by bloggers, website operators, and other citizen media creators, [...] more »

by David Ardia

Back in April, I blogged over at the Citizen Media Law Project about New York’s Libel Terrorism Protection Act, which bars the enforcement of foreign defamation judgments unless a New York court has found that the foreign court proceeding provided at least as much protection for freedom of speech and press in that case as [...] more »

by David Ardia

Last week, the Associated Press (“AP”) sent a takedown request under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to Rogers Cadenhead, the founder of Drudge Retort, a liberal alternative to (and parody of) the well-known Drudge Report, demanding that he remove six user-submitted blog entries and one user comment on the site that contained quotations from AP [...] more »

by David Ardia

Neil Netanel, a highly regarded legal scholar, has an interesting post on Balkinization entitled “The Demise of Newspapers: Economics, Copyright, Free Speech.” Netanel, who has written extensively on copyright issues, posits that part of the reason for the decline in newspapers stems from Internet competitors that build on the content and value that newspapers create. [...] more »

by David Ardia

A federal magistrate judge in New Hampshire has quashed the subpoena issued to Kathleen Seidel. Seidel publishes the blog Neurodiversity, where she writes about autism issues. In February 2008, she wrote about a lawsuit against various vaccine manufacturers, Sykes v. Bayer, in which the plaintiffs Lisa and Seth Sykes seek to link exposure to mercury [...] more »

by David Ardia

We’ve been following the subpoena issued to Kathleen Seidel in the Citizen Media Law Project’s Legal Threats Database, but thought it was time to throw our support behind Seidel and post about this egregious attempt to chill online speech. Seidel publishes the blog Neurodiversity, where she writes about autism issues. In February 2008, she wrote [...] more »

by David Ardia

Back in January, the Citizen Media Law Project began rolling out its Citizen Media Legal Guide. So far, we’ve published major sections of the guide covering Forming a Business and Getting Online, Dealing with Online Legal Risks, and Newsgathering and Privacy. This week we began rolling out the section on Access to Government Information, which [...] more »

by David Ardia

In a case we’ve been following closely at the Citizen Media Law Project, a Vermont judge has dismissed the libel lawsuit filed against Chris Grotke and Lise LePage, co-founders and owners of iBrattleboro.com, a widely acclaimed community journalism site based in Brattleboro, Vermont, ruling that Grotke and LePage are immune from liability under section 230 [...] more »

by David Ardia

(Written by Tuna Chatterjee, CMLP Staff Attorney.) It’s March and it’s Sunshine Week. This year, from March 16 – 22, the American Society of Newspaper Editors is holding its annual initiative to raise public consciousness on the need for open government. The name “Sunshine Week” is derived from the late Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis’s [...] more »