Dan Schultz

Dan Schultz graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 2009 with a BS in Information Systems and minors in Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. He won the Knight News Challenge in 2007, an opportunity that has given him a unique perspective as a young technologist. He has been developing digital community systems for almost a decade, and has worked for The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, CMU, Vanguard, and Colorquick LLC. He has been trained as a system and interface designer, programmer, and project manager and looks forward to taking on some of the creative challenges that lie ahead for this field.

by Dan Schultz

As someone who aspires to be a new media expert, I don’t actually use many popular social media services. I dislike Facebook, I rarely tweet, and before winning the News Challenge I had never written a blog post. It would seem like I’m downright un-hip; yet I’m a young technologist who has been communicating online […] more »

by Dan Schultz

October 12 was a day of high emotion; it was finally time to thrive under pressure. I got home from work, rushed to my friend’s house, and cracked open my laptop. The goal was to brainstorm like crazy, write up some solid project descriptions, and submit as many Knight News Challenge grant applications as possible […] more »

by Dan Schultz

Last week I visited Carnegie Mellon University’s website for the first time as an alumnus. The front page, often dedicated to highlighting faculty work, had a picture of an iPhone screen displaying brightly colored data visualizations. I didn’t have to look past the first two words of the title — “Citizen Scientists” — before I […] more »

by Dan Schultz

If you were a professional journalist and I asked you, “what does mainstream media provide that the crowd can’t?” I have some guesses about what I might hear in your answer: It’s more credible, more comprehensive, fact-checked, less biased, professionally composed, more knowledgeable, presented in the larger context, and more reliable, to name a few. […] more »

by Dan Schultz

During my time at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, I had a chance to learn about some of the harsh realities that come with taking on yet another technology. The general idea was that even if it’s “free,” there is unfortunate baggage that comes with adding tools to the newsroom — baggage like increased overhead, learning curves, […] more »

by Dan Schultz

It’s been a long six months, but I’m finally dusting off my keyboard and re-starting my blog here. First things first, a disclaimer: I don’t graduate until May, so it’s safe to say that I still don’t know what I’m talking about. My hands, however, are a little dirtier than before thanks to folks at […] more »

by Dan Schultz

Whenever I tell someone that I’m majoring in Information Systems the response tends to be something along the lines of “Ahh that’s nice… What’s Information Systems?” For the first two years of my college education my answer was just “think of it as Computer Science lite.” The real answer is much better: Information Systems is […] more »

by Dan Schultz

A few days ago I was snooping around Digg when I noticed a popular submission titled The Difference Between Digg and Reddit. I clicked, eager to learn, and was presented with an image juxtaposing two very distinct flavors of user-submitted comments surrounding the breaking news of Tony Snow’s death. The first comments shown at Digg […] more »

by Dan Schultz

There is one reason and one reason alone that I haven’t catastrophically dropped out of college yet: I avoid World of Warcraft as though it were the plague. In case you are unfamiliar, World of Warcraft is an incredibly popular game made by Blizzard Entertainment in which players take on the role of an adventurer […] more »

by Dan Schultz

We all know that the “audience” analogy no longer represents the way journalism should work. We know that the people reading the news have opinions, perspectives, and facts that are relevant to the conversation. Some of them just have observations, but others are reporters at heart or maybe they have the wordsmithing abilities of a […] more »