Henry Jenkins

by Henry Jenkins

Last time, I introduced George Lakoff’s argument that the two major American political parties adopt different frames, based on images of parenthood and the family, for understanding the political process: the Strict Father paradigm associated with Republicans and the Nurturing Parent paradigm associated with the Democrats. I applied these two frames to looking more closely [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

George Lakoff’s book, Don’t Think About an Elephant, has been one of the most influential arguments about the nature of American politics to emerge in recent years. Lakoff, a linguist, turned his attention to the “framing” of political discourse. If you want to look more closely at his argument, “A Man of His Words“ is [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

During the 2004 presidential election season, I ran a column in Technology Review Online which described the way that average citizens were exploiting their expanded capacity to manipulate and circulate images to create the grassroots equivalent of editorial cartoons. These images often got passed along via e-mail or posted on blogs as a way of [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

This fall, I am going to be teaching a course on New Media Literacies and Civic Engagement, which is designed to help facilitate conversations across two of the projects we run through the Comparative Media Studies program: the Center for Future Civic Media, funded by the Knight Foundation as a collaboration with the MIT Media [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

“In times of terror, when everyone is something of a conspirator, everybody will be in the position of having to play detective” —Walter Benjamin 1938 In the research on media effects, one of the most fully developed findings is what is known as the “mean world syndrome.” Research finds that the average citizen grossly over-estimates [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

The Center for Future Civic Media is collaborating with the MIT Communications Forum to host an ongoing series of conversations about media and civic engagement. This past term, we hosted two such exchanges —- “Our World Digitized: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” an exchange between University of Chicago law professor Cass Sunstein (Infotopia: [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

One of our goals at the Center for Future Civic Media is to identify best practices from existing projects which might inform those initiatives which will emerge from the Center. We want to understand how people out there are using the tools available to them right now to enhance civic awareness, to play informal watchdog [...] more »

by Henry Jenkins

An MIT Communications Forum event, on September 20, represented the formal launch of the new MIT Center for Future Civic Media. The event featured Beth Noveck (NYU Law School), Ethan Zuckerman (Berkman Center, Harvard, and the Global Voices Project), Chris Csikszentmihalyi (MIT Media Lab), and yours truly. You can find a webcast of this event [...] more »