Jay Rosen

Jay Rosen teaches journalism at New York University, where he has been on the faculty since 1986. From 1999 to 2005 he was department chair. Rosen is the author of "PressThink":http://pressthink.org/, a weblog about journalism issues that launched in September 2003. In June 2005, PressThink won the Reporters Without Borders 2005 Freedom Blog award for outstanding defense of free expression. He also blogs at the Huffington Post. In July 2006 he announced the debut of "NewAssignment.net":http://www.newassignment.net/, his experimental site for pro-am, open source reporting projects. His book about the rise of the civic journalism movement, "What Are Journalists For?" was published in 1999 by Yale University Press. He lives in New York City.

by Jay Rosen

Let’s try a simple count of locally produced news stories in your daily newspaper. Yes, the print edition. The whole news system feeds off the flow of newspaper content, right? Lots of people asking, what’s going to replace newspapers if they can’t make it? Expecting amateurs to step in is dumb, and it won’t happen. [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

Maybe information and explanation ought to be reversed in our order of thought. Especially as we contemplate new news systems. What put me in that mind is a special episode of “This American Life” called The Giant Pool of Money. It’s a one-hour explainer on the mortgage crisis, the product of an unusual collaboration between [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

Ever wondered: where’s the time going to come from for all these nifty open source ventures people are planning? Clay Shirky says we got plenty. He just gave an extremely useful and imaginative speech to Web heads about where we are in media time. Shirky, who teaches in a different program at NYU, has a [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

Two weeks ago I participated in a forum on newspapers and the net put on by Britannica Blog. The tone was: are newspapers doomed and does anyone care? My part includes this: At many a conference I have attended on new media and journalism, some old pro whose subsidy is fast disappearing will (mentally) place [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

Two weeks ago I said at Idea Lab that NewAssignment.Net’s third major project—after Assignment Zero and OffTheBus.Net—will be Beatblogging.org. My idea was to run parallel experiments to see whether “beat reporting with a social network” is a viable pro-am method in journalism— or just an attractive concept. I said I was trying to recruit at [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

By now you may have heard about the implosion of Wide Open, a political blog started by the Cleveland Plain-Dealer featuring four voices from the ranks of local bloggers: two left, two right. They were paid as freelance contributors. Here’s the way the “reader representative,” Ted Diadiun, described the meltdown. It began when Rep. Steve [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

Below is a lightly revised version of a letter that went out last week to a number of professional news organizations—some big and famous, some small and unsung—asking if they want to participate in the figuring out. My goal is to find 12 willing beat reporters at 12 newsrooms. I have about 7 to 8 [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

I am at the Online News Association annual meeting in Toronto. Listening to some of the speakers at the J-Lab’s workshop, puzzling through the success of some sites and the failure of others, and putting together what I have learned from four years of doing PressThink, the emerging model I see would combine… √ High [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

It started with: let’s take a beat reporter at a local newspaper with a strong online presence and develop with that reporter a beat-specific “smart mob” or social network that would help in reporting stories and doing a better job on the beat. I would secure the cooperation of the paper and its editor, and [...] more »

by Jay Rosen

At the recent Networked Journalism Summit I referenced a darker argument on the future of online advertising by Doc Searls. Here is where I discuss it. Because I write about the Internet and what it’s doing to the press, and follow that story at my blog, I am sometimes asked what I believe the future [...] more »