Martin Moore

Martin Moore is the director of the Media Standards Trust, a nonprofit organization that aims to foster high quality journalism. He has been working in news and media for more than a decade, including for the BBC, Channel 4, NTL, IPC Media, Trinity Mirror and others. Moore studied history at Cambridge and holds a doctorate from the London School of Economics, where he was teaching and researching until summer 2006.

by Martin Moore

When we launched Churnalism.com in the U.K. in 2011 it was not, shall we say, well received by some of those in the PR world. “PR industry hits out at Churnalism.com site“ read a headline in the U.K. trade paper PR Week. One organization — SWNS — even contacted us to object strongly to the [...] more »

by Martin Moore

The smell of public activism wafted across this year’s Knight Civic Media conference at MIT. Mohammed Nanabhay from Al Jazeera English (AJE) spoke about how Al Jazeera covered the Egyptian revolution. Political consultant Chris Faulkner spoke about Tea Party activism; Yesenia Sanchez, an organizer for the P.A.S.O./Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, talked about [...] more »

by Martin Moore

Ludwig Wittgenstein, poker lover The International Press Telecommunications Council (IPTC) has just launched rNews, a consistent, machine-readable way of expressing news metadata in RDFa (a linked data language). This post explains some of the differences between rNews and hNews and why, if you publish news on the web, you ought to be using one or the [...] more »

by Martin Moore

Editors’ Note: Martin Moore is the director of the Media Standards Trust, which recently launched Churnalism.com — a website that helps the public distinguish journalism from “churnalism,” a news article that is published as journalism, but is essentially a press release without much added. Two weeks in, and the public response to Churnalism.com has been [...] more »

by Martin Moore

It is easy to overestimate the similarities between the U.S. and the U.K. As Oscar Wilde wrote back in 1887, ‘‘We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language.” But one of the unfortunate recent similarities has been the parallel crisis in local news, especially at newspapers. In both countries existing [...] more »

by Martin Moore

Far be it for me to question the brilliance of Google, but in the case of its new news meta tagging scheme, I’m struggling to work out why it is brilliant or how it will be successful. First, we should applaud the sentiment. Most of us would agree that it is a Good Thing that [...] more »

by Martin Moore

The San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865. It is the only daily broadsheet newspaper in San Francisco — and is published online at SFgate.com. In the 1960s Paul Avery was a police reporter at the Chronicle when he started investigating the so-called “Zodiac Killer.” Earlier this year Mark Fiore won a Pulitzer Prize for [...] more »

by Martin Moore

This week Orkney Today announced it was closing. The paper, which served the small islands of Orkney just off the Scottish coast, was — like countless other local papers — battling against declining circulation and disappearing ad revenues. “Orkney Media Group management and the newspaper’s excellent staff have tried a number of initiatives to reverse [...] more »

by Martin Moore

Soon every news organization will have its own “bunker” — a darkened room where a hand-picked group of reporters hole up with a disk/memory stick/laptop of freshly opened data, some stale pizza and lots of coffee. Last year the U.K.‘s Daily Telegraph secreted half a dozen reporters in a room for nine days with about [...] more »

by Martin Moore

People in news don’t generally think of innovation as their job. It’s that old CP Snow thing of the two cultures, where innovation sits on the science not the arts side. I had my own experience of this at the American Society of Newspaper Editors conference in Washington a couple of months ago. After one [...] more »