J. Nathan Matias

Nathan develops technologies for media analytics, community information, and creative learning at the MIT Center for Civic Media, where he is a Research Assistant. Before MIT, Nathan worked in UK startups, developing technologies used by millions of people worldwide. He also helped start the Ministry of Stories, a creative writing center in East London. Nathan was a Davies-Jackson Scholar at the University of Cambridge from 2006-2008.

by J. Nathan Matias

During my work on Social Mirror, tablet tech for social checkups, I have been inspired by other amazing Media Lab social technologies. Here are 12 of the projects which I have found most inspiring, including one or two from other universities. Did I miss a project you love? Post your favorites in the comments. Social […] more »

by J. Nathan Matias

Today with MIT Civic Media Center’s Matt Stempeck and Stephen Suen, I’m live-blogging ROFLCon, a conference for things and people who are famous on the Internet. The livenote index is here. Christina Xu, the event organizer, starts off ROFLCon to cheers. It’s an amazingly packed venue. “One out of eight people in this room have […] more »

by J. Nathan Matias

How can technology help journalists make sense of complex issues and explain them to the public in a clear, understandable manner? Last year, Jay Rosen’s journalism students spent an entire semester researching and making explanations in partnership with ProPublica, a non-profit newsroom which focuses on investigative journalism. The class did amazing work to highlight notable […] more »

by J. Nathan Matias

A version of this post first appeared on the MIT Center for Civic Media blog. How can designers imagine innovative technologies for news and journalism? I think I know one answer. In this post, I propose the Journalism Innovation Spiral and demonstrate it by picking apart the “profile article” for innovative ideas. The resulting design […] more »

by J. Nathan Matias

A version of this post first appeared on the Center for Civic Media blog. Is our appetite for tasty celebrity news and comfortable opinions creating a toxically polarized society? What should our information diet be, and how would we measure it? Who’s responsible for changing the media? At the Center for Civic Media, Clay Johnson, […] more »