Tag: diy

by Stewart Long

Public Lab’s balloon- and kite-based mapping approach is a new way to take aerial images from the ground. However, there are some considerations and things that can be learned from a few map stories. Each map project has distinct characteristics in its time, place, and local atmospheric conditions. Here are several examples of how those [...] more »

by Jeffrey Warren

The Public Lab community has been working on a cheap, open-source spectrometer for detecting environmental contaminants [for some time now](http://publiclaboratory.org/notes/spectrometer). Since the [last spectrometry post](http://www.pbs.org/idealab/2011/09/taking-steps-toward-diy-spectrometry-so-citizens-can-test-for-pollutants249.html), one year ago, a lot has happened, so I thought I’d take the opportunity to write an update on the project. Most importantly, we’ve just launched [a Kickstarter campaign](http://kck.st/PI9XOq) to [...] more »

by Stewart Long

Last week, Public Laboratory announced that public domain maps are now starting to show up on Google Earth and Google Maps. But how did the projects get there? Here’s a timeline of a Public Laboratory map project. Making a map Public Laboratory projects take a community-based approach to making maps that differs depending on where [...] more »

by Shannon Dosemagen

We’ve just announced that community-generated open-source maps from the Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (PLOTS) — captured from kites and balloons — have been added to Google Earth. The 45-plus maps are the first aerial maps produced by citizens to be featured on the site, and are highlighted on the Google Lat Long [...] more »

by Liz Barry

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, N.Y., has inspired urban legends from the forensic to the ecotopian. In the year and a half since the Environmental Protection Agency bestowed its Superfund designation, the canal has become a site of even more intense re-imagination by several groups, some of whom are customizing Public Laboratory tools for deepening [...] more »

by Jeffrey Warren

Several Public Laboratory groups have emerged around the development of new tools for measuring contamination and quantifying ecologic issues. Among them is an informal spectrometry working group, which is attempting to create an inexpensive spectrometer. Such an instrument offers the possibility of detecting and even quantifying contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs — [...] more »