Tag: economics

by Steven Clift

I come from the “citizen” side of citizen media and work a lot with community building online. Everyday, I an privileged to live in a neighborhood with a vibrant online community far from the wretched shores media hosted mostly anonymous and frequently disturbing online reader comments. So, from my non-profit perspective, when I look at [...] more »

by Ellen Hume

Journalism requires not only a business model, but a culture. At the Center for Future Civic Media, we sometimes take a moment to reflect on the online news experiments begun in the pioneer digital media days in the 1990s, to keep a clear head about how journalism and social networks intersect. But perhaps we shouldn’t [...] more »

by Andrius Kulikauskas

Do you ever have an extra day? or a day’s wage? A denarius, as in Roman days? A Sunday or twelve hours of sun spread out over a year? The Includer is a human-sized device, the product of a human-sized economy, the sum of working one day at a time. Jackton Arija was the spark [...] more »

by Geoff Dougherty

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been interviewing candidates for an associate editor’s position at the Daily News. Several things about that process convinced me that the tide has turned, both for our organization and for online news: I’ve been explicit with our candidates about the risks involved. We’re a start-up, and it’s possible that [...] more »

by Geoff Dougherty

A lot of the interest in citizen journalism over the past few years has been related to economics. Sign up a bunch of users on your site, get them to write stuff, sell ads along side the free content, retire early. While some content that comes in this way is impeccably written and delightfully newsworthy, [...] more »

by Benjamin Melançon

Thanks to Chris O’Brien’s challenge, serious talk of business models for journalism have come to the IdeaLab blog. Let’s pause a moment for an overarching view. Turn off the bright lights and stare into the empty studio. Markets – selling and buying at prices set by supply and demand – don’t work for news and [...] more »