Tag: grassroots mapping

by Mathew Lippincott

This post compares technologies for aerial photography, but it is also about how tool choices can embed values, including transparency, openness, and accessibility, into the growing popular culture of mapping. Falkirk Young Archaeologists’ Club takes a self portrait from the top of a carp fishing pole. Most map imagery is collected by airplane or satellite [...] more »

by Stewart Long

Last week, Public Laboratory announced that public domain maps are now starting to show up on Google Earth and Google Maps. But how did the projects get there? Here’s a timeline of a Public Laboratory map project. Making a map Public Laboratory projects take a community-based approach to making maps that differs depending on where [...] more »

by Shannon Dosemagen

We’ve just announced that community-generated open-source maps from the Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (PLOTS) — captured from kites and balloons — have been added to Google Earth. The 45-plus maps are the first aerial maps produced by citizens to be featured on the site, and are highlighted on the Google Lat Long [...] more »

by Stewart Long

The Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (PLOTS) is an organization and membership community which develops and applies open-source tools to environmental exploration and investigation. Public Laboratory’s mapping tools, openly available and easy to use, are putting the ability to do processes such as georectifying in the hands of people who may have never [...] more »

by Mathew Lippincott

This article was co-written by Olivia Everett, Butte site coordinator for Public Laboratory.   As a newcomer to Butte, Mont., and as a grassroots mapper, I’ve learned a lot about a neighborhood’s memories of itself, and the role that mapping can play in reasserting a human-scale sense of place. My experience here has since led [...] more »

by Liz Barry

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, N.Y., has inspired urban legends from the forensic to the ecotopian. In the year and a half since the Environmental Protection Agency bestowed its Superfund designation, the canal has become a site of even more intense re-imagination by several groups, some of whom are customizing Public Laboratory tools for deepening [...] more »

by Shannon Dosemagen

Recently, a resident of Plaquemines Parish, La., made a striking comment to me about the importance of local involvement and knowledge in post-disaster projects: Listen to the people that have been down here, lived here, fished here, and camped here their whole entire lives and even their parents’ lives, for generations. Because they know how [...] more »

by Andrew Whitacre

I’m helping MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media put together a talk on how better to cover slow-motion disasters, and I’d like your thoughts. The bursting of the housing bubble, for example, cost the American economy $8.3 trillion. Yet for a decade, national media missed signs of the coming disaster, acting instead to simply keep [...] more »

by Jeffrey Warren

For the past few weeks I’ve been working from Tbilisi, Georgia — the other Georgia — with a fascinating organization called OpenMapsCaucasus (OMC for short), which has been hard at work creating the first participatory, public domain road map of an entire country. Created by JumpStart International, and building on previous mapping work in the [...] more »