Tag: guardian

by J. Nathan Matias

Can high-resolution data and innovative technology help us create better representation of women in the news? I believe so. Over the next year, my thesis project is to design a series of articles, artistic pieces, and technologies for gender equity. I’m going beyond mudslinging and hand wringing to apply technology in constructive ways that can [...] more »

by Martin Keegan

The people have a right to know, but sometimes they’re a bit too busy to find out for themselves. Informed citizens have both the need and the desire to know about public affairs, whether public or of a more private nature. For as long as there has been democracy, there’s also been a free press, [...] more »

by Dan Sinker

This week I’ve spent a lot of time writing about the opportunities that lie at the intersection of open-source philosophies and journalism. Today the “thinking out loud” stops, and the “making it happen” begins. And that begins with the announcement of the 2011/12 Knight-Mozilla fellows. But before I get to that, a quick background: In [...] more »

by Nathaniel James

I’m excited to announce the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership, a Mozilla Drumbeat project supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s Journalism Program. For the next three years, we will have the opportunity to engage a huge community, bring people together for trainings and in-person events, and ultimately build software and thought leadership [...] more »

by Martin Moore

Soon every news organization will have its own “bunker” — a darkened room where a hand-picked group of reporters hole up with a disk/memory stick/laptop of freshly opened data, some stale pizza and lots of coffee. Last year the U.K.‘s Daily Telegraph secreted half a dozen reporters in a room for nine days with about [...] more »

by Martin Moore

What’s the future of news? I’m tempted to say “not very much” since no one really knows too much about the future of news right now. You know this is true because senior news folk have given up on the doom and gloom stuff and are starting to talk about “the golden age of journalism” [...] more »