Tag: plots

by Shannon Dosemagen

This post was co-authored by Public Lab’s Jessi Breen and Liz Barry. This year’s Public Lab Barnraising brought 50 people together in Louisiana for our annual, retreat-style community gathering. This is the closest thing we have to a Public Lab conference — but with an emphasis on “doing stuff together” rather than just presenting/talking. In […] more »

by Shannon Dosemagen

This post was co-written by Public Lab organizer Don Blair. Public Lab is pleased to announce the launch of our fourth Kickstarter today, “Infragram: the Infrared Photography Project.” The idea for the Infragram was originally conceptualized during the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and as a tool for monitoring wetland damages. Since […] more »

by Mathew Lippincott

Detritivores are creatures that consume decaying matter. Detritivore designs use abundant waste products to make scalable technology solutions. Unlike loftier concepts of zero-waste design such as Cradle to Cradle, Detritivore design accepts that the world is already loaded with discarded and broken technology. Detritivore designers need not create a recyclable or even non-toxic product, since […] more »

by Jeffrey Warren

This post was co-authored with [Becki Chall](http://publiclaboratory.org/people/becki), also from Public Lab [Public Lab](http://publiclaboratory.org) is structured like many open-source communities, with a non-profit hosting and coordinating the efforts of a broader, distributed community of contributors and members. However, we are in the unique position that our community creates innovative open-source hardware projects — tools to measure […] more »

by Adam Griffith

Third graders from Isaac Dixon Elementary School in Asheville, N.C., help make a high-resolution map of Riverside Cemetery with the Public Laboratory. As Scott Barnwell looked toward the horizon of Riverside Cemetery in Asheville, N.C., a flock of third graders came into view, and his hand tightened on the string tethering a massive, red helium-filled […] more »

by Shannon Dosemagen

This post was co-written by Public Lab organizer Chris Fastie. During the BP oil spill in 2010, as aerial mappers walked coastlines and boated waterways to document environmental impacts, we encountered tarry clumps in the sand or reddish clayey masses floating around the boat. We often weren’t sure whether these objects were crude oil from […] more »

by Stewart Long

Public Lab’s balloon- and kite-based mapping approach is a new way to take aerial images from the ground. However, there are some considerations and things that can be learned from a few map stories. Each map project has distinct characteristics in its time, place, and local atmospheric conditions. Here are several examples of how those […] more »

by Liz Barry

What happens when you introduce biologists who want microbial samples from 500 feet up in the air to the Public Laboratory community of balloon mappers? Or play matchmaker between entomologists with global biodiversity records dating back to the 1700s and data scientists who are jonesing to visualize? How about getting 30 people in a room […] more »

by Shannon Dosemagen

Over the weekend of November 2-4, Public Lab held the second annual barn raising in Cocodrie, La., at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium facility. The concept of an organization focused on science and technology holding a barn raising sounds strange. But we borrow the term to signify the collaborative spirit that’s at the core of […] more »

by Jeffrey Warren

The Public Lab community has been working on a cheap, open-source spectrometer for detecting environmental contaminants [for some time now](http://publiclaboratory.org/notes/spectrometer). Since the [last spectrometry post](http://www.pbs.org/idealab/2011/09/taking-steps-toward-diy-spectrometry-so-citizens-can-test-for-pollutants249.html), one year ago, a lot has happened, so I thought I’d take the opportunity to write an update on the project. Most importantly, we’ve just launched [a Kickstarter campaign](http://kck.st/PI9XOq) to […] more »