Tag: privacy

by Sandra Ordonez

A few years back, the first digital tsunami hit the journalism world, and I became fascinated with how digital was transforming the field. After conducting more than 350 interviews with diverse┬ájournalism experts, it was apparent that journalists saw the new opportunities that the digital world offered, but felt that they and journalism departments lacked the […] more »

by Sean McDonald

Do you remember when grocery stores didn’t know you were pregnant before your parents? Or when newspapers couldn’t find naked pictures of you by looking through your phone? Boy, those were the days (When did I get this old?). Still, there’s no escaping it. Things are digitizing. Everywhere. Whether you’re registering to vote in Washington […] more »

by Matt Stempeck

The following is a liveblog of an MIT Facebook recruiting event by Matt Stempeck, Rodrigo Davies, and Chris Peterson. We’ve had all of our data on Facebook for years. And advertisers have used Facebook’s self-service ad-buying platform, similar to Graph Search, to segment and target ads at us for years. But now, the rollout of […] more »

by Val Wang

One of the first questions people ask when I tell them about our project, Order in the Court 2.0, to live-stream court proceedings is, “Is there a way to turn the camera off?” They must imagine a camera bolted to the wall, gobbling up images of domestic violence victims and child sex offenders with no […] more »

by Val Wang

One of the first things First Justice Mark Coven told us when we went down to the Quincy District Court to start talking about our project, Order in the Court 2.0, was that we had to hold an all-court meeting to introduce the project to everyone to get their input. This seemed like an excellent […] more »

by John Davidow

Going into last week’s meeting at Quincy District Court, Joan Kenney, the state court’s chief public information officer and I had a quick phone meeting on what we were going to talk about at an upcoming meeting with Judge Andre A. Gelinas. Judge Gelinas, a retired justice who sat on the Massachusetts Appeals Court, now […] more »

by Ellen Hume

I have invited researchers at MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media to participate in an effort to blow the whistle on groups who are falsely presenting themselves as “ordinary bloggers,” but instead are paid to spread false information about candidates during the 2008 campaign in viral internet campaigns to influence voters. The project, already involving […] more »

by David Ardia

Here is a simple, but often ignored, truth: if you publish online, whether it’s a news article, blog post, podcast, video, or even a user comment, you open yourself up to potential legal liability. It doesn’t matter whether you are a professional journalist, hockey-mom, or an obscure blogger, if you post it, you’ll need to […] more »

by David Ardia

Today, we are launching the final sections of the Citizen Media Law Project’s online guide to media law covering the risks associated with publishing online, including defamation and privacy law.  (You can read the press release here.)  The free online guide, which is intended for use by bloggers, website operators, and other citizen media creators, […] more »

by Benjamin Melan├žon

Related Content: If you’re in California’s bay area, don’t miss Drupal Day on Friday May 3, a special open session of NewsTools2008’s mixing up journalists, technologists, entrepreneurs. Journalism’s charge is to increase the signal to noise ratio. Some commentators on stuff, including my favorite marketing guru, say the irrelevant noise has begun encroaching on the […] more »