Tag: recovers.org

by Caitria O’Neill

I work for a civic technology startup in San Francisco, but I’m a small-town native who works daily with small to midsized communities. As such, when I read or hear about the latest “answer” to civic problems, created by a team of geniuses and piloted in one of the largest cities in the country, I’m [...] more »

by Emily Wright

Low vacancy, so many homeless people, beautiful old buildings, shuttle buses to Silicon Valley … and warning, I’m going to talk about earthquakes. If it gets scary, stick with me: There’s good news at the end, ways to better understand the specific risks facing San Francisco, and some easy places to start. Let’s Talk Numbers [...] more »

by Caitria O’Neill

Image courtesy of NASA #Sandy #OMG #disaster Now that I’ve gotten your attention with the hurricane pulping the East Coast, I want to talk to you about smaller disasters. Face it — not every disaster is as fun to follow as a mega-storm. Ice storms aren’t generally live-blogged on HuffPost. Apartment fires rarely trend on [...] more »

by Caitria O’Neill

“Whole Community Resilience” is an incredibly complicated way of saying “getting locals involved with disasters.” It is the most basic, intuitive, and neglected part of the American system of disaster management. Why is this? Why do we acknowledge the importance of community efforts and then leave them completely out of our plans? Well first, we [...] more »

by Caitria O’Neill

You don’t speak FEMA? That’s OK — you can still help your community bounce back from a disaster. Last June, a tornado tore the roof off my life — but to my surprise, recovery did not end with a blue tarp patching the holes. Shortly after the EF3 passed through Monson, Mass., I was pulled [...] more »

by Desiree Everts

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation today announced the winners of its first round of this year’s Knight News Challenge contest at the MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference held in Cambridge, Mass. Networks is a theme you’ll see running through the winners. That’s because that was the focus of this year’s first round. What [...] more »