Tag: survey

by Kristofs Blaus

A few months ago, we became the largest crowdsourced journalism project in Latvia to date. We reached 2% of the general population and gathered unique data. However, to generate the data and launch the survey we had to program, design and test the system for weeks and invest several thousand dollars in it. The experience [...] more »

by Dan Schultz

Last month, I ran a user study to test the effectiveness of Truth Goggles (a credibility layer/B.S. detector for the Internet). The tool attempts to remind users when it’s important to think more carefully. If you’re curious, you can check out the demo page. Now that the study has officially concluded, the numbers have been [...] more »

by David Cohn

This came across my social media feed Thursday morning: “Google Unveils New Revenue Option for Web Publishers.” In short: It’s a simple technology where readers who come across a pay wall can opt into taking a survey instead of having to reach for their wallet. The survey then creates some funds for the publisher and [...] more »

by Christopher Groskopf

The first PANDA task officially checked off our to-do list was the drafting of our Future Users Survey. We distributed a link to the survey via Twitter, the NICAR-L mailing list and email. The PANDA project aims to make basic data analysis quick and easy for news organizations, and make data sharing simple. The survey [...] more »

by David Cohn

The Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy made 15 recommendations on how America can have a bright info-future. One of those recommendations was for increased support for public media predicated on public media efforts to “step up,” for lack of a better term. Public media has been on the minds [...] more »

by David Cohn

This post was written by Jonathan Peters. The data comes from the Free Press sponsorship on Spot.Us, part of our experiment with the Reynolds Journalism Institute in Community-Focused sponsorship. Profits are killing journalism. Publishers and editors care more about the bottom line than the quality of their reporting. Newsrooms are shrinking, as a result, and [...] more »

by Scott Rosenberg

Because web pages are just computer files, news stories on the web can be altered at will after publication. That makes corrections on the web a little more complex than corrections in print — but it also makes them potentially much more effective. Unlike in print or broadcast, you can fix the original. You can [...] more »