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TAG: black history

HBCU Grads Share Their Stories of Campus Life

Graduates of Historic Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are proud alums, and with the release of the new Independent Lens film Tell Them We Are Rising [premiering Feb. 19 at 9pm; check local listings], which tells the 170 years—and rising—history of HBCUs, we found a few who were happy to tell their own stories of life … READ MORE

How “I Am Not Your Negro” Filmmaker Reopened James Baldwin’s “House”

The worldly Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck and his family fled the Duvalier dictatorship in 1961 and found asylum in the Democratic Republic of Congo, before Peck finished his schooling in the United States, France, and Germany. Currently living in both France and the U.S., Peck has been given numerous Human Rights Watch awards, including a Lifetime Achievement Award in … READ MORE

Stanley Nelson Reveals the Real Black Panther Party

Filmmaker Stanley Nelson, who won an Emmy for the PBS documentary The Murder of Emmett Till, three Emmys for Freedom Riders, and made an acclaimed film about Marcus Garvey, has for years aimed his probing but fair-minded lens on civil rights history. Along the way he realized he hadn’t really seen a film that covered the full and fascinating … READ MORE

Breaking Barriers on Stage: African American Ballet Dancers Who Made History

As we learn in A Ballerina’s Tale, Nelson George’s new documentary about Misty Copeland [February 8; check local listings], Eurocentric standards of body shape, muscle tone, and skin color excluded dancers who didn’t fit the wan mold demanded of prima ballerinas. All that changed in the summer of 2015, when Misty Copeland, a rising star already transcending the rarified … READ MORE

Black Family History Through a Lens

A wonderful companion piece to Thomas Allen Harris‘s new film Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People is his Digital Diaspora Family Reunion project — a roadshow connecting communities and history through family photographic archives. Read more about the project in this Documentary Magazine piece, which accurately sums it up as using “the power of interactive … READ MORE

Thomas Allen Harris Goes Through a Lens Darkly

Filmmaker Harris — whose films and installations have been featured at prestigious film festivals as well as museums and galleries including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Biennial, the Corcoran Gallery, Reina Sophia, and the London Institute of the Arts — talked to us about his own relationship with photography and what he hopes viewers will gain from seeing Through a Lens Darkly.

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Black History Month: From the Independent Lens Archives

Our programming aims to celebrate black history more than just during the month February, but Black History Month is certainly a great time to pause and reflect on African American history both distant and recent. We’ve collected some of our favorite Independent Lens films that delve into different aspects of black history and culture through the … READ MORE

‘Green Book’ Helped Keep African Americans Safe on the Road

Hardly anyone knows about The Green Book now, but from 1936 to 1964, it was an essential publication for African Americans who hoped to travel safely. The book listed businesses that welcomed blacks during a time when segregation and Jim Crow laws often made travel difficult — and sometimes dangerous.

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The 2012 Winter/Spring Season is Here!

Hosted by Mary-Louise Parker, the Independent Lens Winter/Spring lineup includes the award-winning films We Were Here, Hell and Back Again, Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey, and more! “Our upcoming winter/spring season features a robust slate of some of the most engaging and award-winning documentaries ever on Independent Lens,” said Senior Series Producer Lois Vossen. “It’s … READ MORE