Dolores – Young Dolores Huerta Takes on Sacramento – Clip

In this excerpt from the Independent Lens film Dolores, we see how activist Dolores Huerta, when she was just starting out as a community organizer in her mid-20s in 1959, quickly made a name for herself as a lobbyist and fierce advocate for Latinos, immigration rights, and labor justice. Her dedication helped get key legislation passed … READ MORE

Tell Them We Are Rising – Separate But Unequal – Clip

In this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary Tell Them We Are Rising, future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall, not a great student when an undergrad at Lincoln University but who became a brilliant legal mind at Howard University Law School, takes a road trip in 1934 with Howard Law dean Charles Hamilton Houston to … READ MORE

Dolores – Trailer

With intimate and unprecedented access, Peter Bratt’s Dolores tells the story of Dolores Huerta, among the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history. Co-founder of the first farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez, she tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century.

Rat Film – “Rats Put Food on My Table” – Clip

In this excerpt from the Independent Lens film Rat Film, Harold Edmond, a rat exterminator in Baltimore, helps a resident figure out how to handle the rats infesting her backyard, a common problem in certain Baltimore neighborhoods. After rats learned to avoid the poisoned peanut butter, she switches to BBQ sauce with better success. “They … READ MORE

Rat Film – Trailer

In his critically-acclaimed directorial debut, Theo Anthony uses the rat to burrow into the dark, complicated history of Baltimore. A bizarre blend of history, science and sci-fi, poetry and portraiture, Rat Film provocatively explores how racial segregation, discriminatory lending practices known as “redlining,” and environmental racism built the Baltimore that exists today. What begins as … READ MORE

Winnie – Losing Her Identity as “Mandela’s Wife” – Clip

In this selection from the Independent Lens film Winnie, Nelson Mandela returns from a long prison sentence but fails to credit his activist-wife Winnie Mandela for her role in keeping the fight against apartheid going while he was imprisoned. Winnie herself comments that she had lost her identity when he returned, that she was once … READ MORE

Tell Them We Are Rising – Trailer

The rich history of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) began before the end of slavery, flourished in the 20th century, and profoundly influenced the course of the nation for over 150 years — yet remains largely unknown. With Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities, the latest documentary … READ MORE

Filmmakers Marco Williams and Stanley Nelson Tell an Essential Chapter of American History in Story of HBCUs

Tell Them We Are Rising, which premieres on Independent Lens on PBS Monday, February 19 at 9 pm [check local listings], covers the rich history of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) from before the end of slavery through a flourishing in the 20th century to today, and how they profoundly influenced the course of … READ MORE

Winnie – Trailer

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is one of the most misunderstood and intriguing of contemporary female political figures. Her rise and seeming fall from grace bear the hallmarks of epic tragedy. For the first time on screen, Winnie explores her life and contribution to the struggle to bring down apartheid in South Africa from the inside, with intimate … READ MORE

I Am Not Your Negro

The Oscar-nominated I Am Not Your Negro envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, a radical narration about race in America, using the writer’s original words, as read by actor Samuel L. Jackson. The film draws upon Baldwin’s notes on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and MLK to explore and bring … READ MORE

How “I Am Not Your Negro” Filmmaker Reopened James Baldwin’s “House”

The worldly Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck and his family fled the Duvalier dictatorship in 1961 and found asylum in the Democratic Republic of Congo, before Peck finished his schooling in the United States, France, and Germany. Currently living in both France and the U.S., Peck has been given numerous Human Rights Watch awards, including a Lifetime Achievement Award in … READ MORE