Renee Tajima-Peña on the Women of the Madrigal vs Quilligan Case

Filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary for her film Who Killed Vincent Chin?, which aired on PBS back in 1989. She’s hardly sat still since then; her films have premiered at Sundance, Cannes, San Francisco International, New Directors/New Films, Toronto, the Whitney Biennial and other festivals around the world. And as she … READ MORE

Black Panther Style

This excerpt from The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution takes a look at the unique hairstyle and fashion worn by members of the Black Panther Party, many of whom were teenagers when they joined and unafraid to be black, to be themselves.

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution Trailer

A new revolutionary culture emerged in the turbulent 1960s, and the Black Panther Party was at the vanguard. Weaving together a treasure trove of rare footage with the voices of a diverse group of people who were there, Stanley Nelson tells the vibrant story of a pivotal movement as urgent today as it was then.

Peace Officer

William “Dub” Lawrence was a former sheriff who established and trained one of Utah’s first SWAT teams, only to watch in horror as that same unit killed his son-in-law in a controversial standoff years later. In Peace Officer, Dub, driven by an obsessive sense of mission, uses his investigative skills to uncover the truth about … READ MORE

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

In the turbulent 1960s, change was coming to America and the fault lines could no longer be ignored — cities were burning, Vietnam was exploding, and disputes raged over equality and civil rights. A new revolutionary culture was emerging and it sought to drastically transform the system. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense would, for … READ MORE

No Más Bebés

No Más Bebés tells the story of a little-known but landmark event in reproductive justice, when a small group of Mexican immigrant women sued county doctors, the state, and the U.S. government after they were sterilized while giving birth at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center during the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Music is the Message

The soundtrack to America’s civil rights movement before the mid-1960s was predominantly made up of gospel standards and spirituals, with a smattering of popular folk. But by the late 1960s, music was changing right along with the political landscape. Just as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X parted ways in their philosophies of how … READ MORE

Timeline of Anti-Apartheid Movement

The original inhabitants of the southern tip of Africa were Bushmen and Hottentots — mostly hunter-gatherers organized into tribes. It was not until the 17th century, when explorers from the Dutch East Indies landed at the Cape of Good Hope that the wheels were set in motion for a collision between cultures that caused a … READ MORE

Limited Partnership

Decades before The Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8, one gay couple fell in love and took on the U.S. government to fight for marriage and immigration equality. Limited Partnership chronicles the 40-year love story between Filipino American Richard Adams and his Australian husband, Tony Sullivan, who in 1975 became one of the world’s … READ MORE

County Clerk Changes History

Learn more about the story of Clela Rorex, former County Clerk in Boulder, CO, who in 1975 helped change history by becoming the first in the United States to approve a marriage license for gay couples, including Richard Adams and Tony Sullivan. Their 40-year struggle for marriage equality is featured in Limited Partnership on Independent … READ MORE

Limited Partnership: Preview

Decades before The Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8, one gay couple, a Filipino American and an Australian, fell in love and over the course of 40 years took on the U.S. government to fight for marriage and immigration equality.

How They Met

Richard Adams and Tony Sullivan talk about how they first met and fell in love in the early 1970s in Los Angeles, and how immigration laws at the time gave them no rights as a gay couple. They were men without a country.