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"You Be The Coach"

Estimated Time of Completion: Two 45-minute class periods with one day of research

I. Summary
II. Objectives
III. Materials Needed
IV. Procedure
V. Classroom Assessment
VI. Extensions and Adaptations
VII. Online Resources
VIII. Relevant National Standards

I. Summary:

For grades 7-12. Students will brainstorm their favorite sports, then form small groups based upon the mutual sport of interest. Students investigate the coaching of the sport by reading about the sport in books or magazines, viewing televised or video sports programs, searching the Internet for Web sites on sports and youth, interviewing local high school, college, YMCA/YWCA or recreation program coaches, or viewing the sport in person. Students outline or diagram how to teach the specific essential skills for their favorite sport, then demonstrate the skills to the class, using classmates as active participants. Then students discuss reasons why sports, athletics or physical activities should be an important part of teens' lives.

II. Objectives:

III. Materials Needed:

IV. Procedure:

  1. Introduce the video "Sports: Get in the Game!" by asking students to brainstorm a list of sports. You or a student should write the list on the chalk or message board. The list may include: baseball, football, soccer, fishing, wrestling, ice skating, in-line skating, skateboarding, softball, swimming, running, aerobics, dancing, cheerleading, walking, golf, bowling, basketball, tennis, rugby, Lacrosse, hockey, horseback riding, track & field, gymnastics, windsurfing, weightlifting, volleyball, water or snow skiing, jumping rope, among others.

  2. Instruct the students to view the video and note the variety of sports discussed. Ask them to listen for reasons why sports, athletics or physical activities should be an important part of teenager's lives.

  3. Show the PBS In the Mix video "Sports: Get In The Game!"

  4. Following the video, ask the students if there were any sports mentioned in the video that are not found on the list on the chalkboard/message board. Add any additional ones not previously noted.

  5. Then pass out one 3" x 5" blank card to each student.

    • Ask each student to write his/her name on the card, and then write the numbers 1, 2, and 3, one under the other.
    • After the number 1, write their very favorite sport, following number 2, their second favorite and the same for the third favorite sport.
    • When all students have completed numbers 1-3, using the list on the board, ask students to raise their hand and identify whether that is their favorite sport.
    • Identify 4 to 5 students whose hands are raised and put them into a group (i.e., baseball group, in-line skating group, etc.). Follow the "sports" list on the board until all students have their first choice, or until all students are grouped (by second or third choice).

  6. Advise students that they will work in a small group to learn how their assigned sport is played and taught. They will investigate the specific, essential skills needed to effectively perform that sport. Inform students that as a group, they will be coaching the rest of the class on the skills of the sport.

    Examples of essential skills: tennis (serve, ready position and toss), golf (full swing for irons and woods), swimming (breast stroke), baseball (hitting, throwing, running), etc.

    • Students may investigate the skills by: reading about the sport in books or magazines, viewing televised or video sports programs, searching the Internet for websites on sports and youth, interviewing local high school, college, YMCA/YWCA or recreation program coaches, or viewing the sport in person.

    • Each of the students in the group will describe in written format, or illustrate in a drawing or diagram, how to perform a specific and essential skill for their favorite sport.

    • As a class demonstration, the small group of students sharing the diagrams or outlines, will demonstrate all of the essential skills researched for the sport. The remainder of the class will actively participate as each group "coaches" the class.

    • Following all "coaching" presentations, ask students to make a personal assessment and respond (this may be done verbally or in a journal-writing exercise):

      • What did you learn from the group activity?
      • Did you realize the level of difficultly in teaching a particular skill and doing it correctly?
      • What else did you learn about yourselves and working with peers?
      • Would you like to coach a sport? To children, or adults?

    • Finally, ask students what are some reasons why sports, athletics or physical activities should be an important part of teenager's lives?

V. Classroom Assessment:

ASSESSING STUDENT GROUP WORK:

Each of the following criteria is worth 5 points:

ASSESSING STUDENT INDIVIDUAL WORK:

Each of the following criteria is worth 2 points:

STUDENT SELF-ASSESSMENT:

Have each student fill out the self-assessment form.

VI. Extensions and Adaptations:

VII. Online Resources:

Sports and youth, coaching sports, youth sports pages

Physical fitness and health Government resources on physical activity and youth

VIII. Relevant National Standards:

The following are established by the National Health Education Standards at http://www.cancer.org/cshe/cshestud.html:

Health

The following are established by McREL at http://www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarks/docs/contents.html:

Physical Education

Behavioral Studies Life Skills Language Arts

About the Author:
Susan Giarratano-Russell
, MSPH, EdD, CHES is a consultant for Health Education and Media. She is a writer and has been a middle school and high school teacher, as well as a university professor of health education.

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