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We're Still Here
What's Race got to do with it?
Haunani Trask

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The third program is a contemporary look at two communities often overlooked in the race dialogue: American Indians and Native Hawaiians. On the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, the program features the voices of three generations of Lakota families as they consider their past, their future and the process of merging multiple world views, ways of life, and ideas of America. Through the stories of these families the film considers the historical construction of Indian "otherness" and its influence on the ways a new generation of Lakota people will address issues of unemployment, alcohol, domestic abuse, and apathy ravaging their community. Meanwhile, across the Pacific Ocean, beginning in the late 1990s, lawsuit after lawsuit challenged the rights of Native Hawaiians to run schools and housing programs that provided only for their beleaguered community. Having been accused of reverse-racism, how do they see themselves in relation to the rest of the nation? And what are their connections to other Native communities? These are the questions explored in this film, which is directed by Sindi Gordon.

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Talk about YOUR THOUGHTS:
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"History of Survival: A Pine Ridge Example"
by Desiree Renee Martinez, Gabrielino (Tongva)


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Aaron Running Hawklisten

" If you donít get enough people with enough what they consider blood quantum on a reservation, itís no longer a reservation. Itís no longer a nation. Thatís what the United States government thinks. You gotta be one half and over. So now they want to enforce that. But if you look at people here, the children, a lot of Ďem ainít one half. In their hearts theyíre full blood, but blood wise, theyíre not half. So thatís one way of getting rid of the Indian. Weíre a thorn in their side. This is what they want. They want this land. "


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