Alexa Capeloto

Alexa Capeloto is a journalism professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/City University of New York. She earned her master's degree at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism, and spent 10 years as a metro reporter and editor at the Detroit Free Press and the San Diego Union-Tribune before transitioning into academia.

by Alexa Capeloto

In almost any city you can read your local leaders’ emails if you formally ask for them. In Gainesville, Fla., all you have to do is go here. In most states you can find out how tax dollars are being spent if you officially request expenditure records. In Wisconsin, you just click here. For the […] more »

by Alexa Capeloto

Most journalism professors are probably familiar with the Poynter Institute’s News University, an online training ground of webinars and self-directed courses for media professionals and students. In fact, if they’re like me they incorporate free modules like The Lead Lab and The Be a Reporter Game into their classes. And why not? They are a […] more »

by Alexa Capeloto

It was just over a year ago that a college newspaper in Oklahoma became a digital media pioneer. In what was believed to be a first for a college news outlet, The Daily O’Collegian at Oklahoma State University began charging for online content. Sure, the Wall Street Journal, Times of London and other professional publications […] more »

by Alexa Capeloto

“Beyond J-School 2011” is sponsored by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, which offers an intensive, cutting edge, three semester Master of Arts in Journalism; a unique one semester Advanced Certificate in Entrepreneurial Journalism; and the CUNY J-Camp series of Continuing Professional Development workshops focused on emerging trends and skill sets in the industry. This […] more »

by Alexa Capeloto

Journalism textbooks can be a challenge (or as one commenter on my recent post on the subject called them, an oxymoron) in today’s fast-changing media world. The long wait between writing and publication usually means at least portions of a book about journalism will seem outdated when it finally reaches the hands of college students. […] more »

by Alexa Capeloto

Rachele Kanigel had two thoughts when she started reading about the journalistic potential of Google+, the new social-networking program that just might push onto Facebook’s turf. The first: “This academic year, everyone is going to discover Google+ and student newsrooms are going to be doing a lot with it.” The second: “Darn.” Kanigel, a journalism […] more »