Clothilde Le Coz

Clothilde Le Coz has been working for Reporters Without Borders in Paris since 2007. She is now the Washington director for this organization, helping to promote press freedom and free speech around the world. In Paris, she was in charge of the Internet Freedom desk and worked especially on China, Iran, Egypt and Thailand. During the time she spent in Paris, she was also updating the "Handbook for Bloggers and Cyberdissidents," launched in 2005 by Reporters Without Borders. Her role is now to get the message out for readers and politicians to be aware of the constant threat journalists are submitted to in many countries.

by Clothilde Le Coz

On June 3 of last year, MediaShift published the article “Crisis in Thailand Leads to Net Crackdown, Censorship“ on the harassment journalists and netizens faced as political clashes arose in the country. Many of the comments in a long thread following its publication mentioned the monarchy. Some of the comments were just opinions, but according [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

The eG8 conference held in Paris on May 24 and 25 sounded promising; it was the first event to gather G8 members (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and Russia) to discuss views on “civilizing cyberspace.” It was also the first forum to talk about the digital economy. At least, [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

WASHINGTON, DC — Since May 3, 1991, World Press Freedom Day has been celebrated worldwide annually to raise awareness of the importance of freedom of the press and remind governments of their duty to respect it. Marking the 20th anniversary last Tuesday, an international conference was organized in Washington, DC, by the United Nations Educational, [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Even though they’re far away from the center of the action in Cairo, Chinese web users felt the impact of the current demonstrations and political change afoot in Egypt. Chinese users searching for “Egypt” on Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, came up empty, and 467 sites were reported inaccessible after a call for a [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Click here to read all the year-end roundups Despite some good PR for online freedom this year, online censorship grew and became more subtle in 2010. Online propaganda remains strong within countries like China and Iran, where media censorship is everywhere and the governments have mastered online censorship tools. These countries are as efficient as [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Japanese journalist Toru Yamaji, the head of the Tokyo-based news agency APF, was arrested over the weekend in the eastern border town of Myawaddy, Burma, after reportedly entering from Thailand. He was taken by helicopter to the Burmese capital, Naypyitaw, for questioning by military intelligence. Yamaji was attempting to report on the ongoing elections in [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Reporters Without Borders yesterday released its 2010 World Press Freedom Index. Thirteen of the EU’s 27 members are in the top 20 in terms of press freedoms, but some of the other EU nations are very low. The European Union has had a reputation for valuing and respecting human rights, and new data suggests that [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

On September 8, the French Senate voted for a bill, called Loppsi 2, that seeks to create a dangerous online filtering system that could jeopardize the work of journalists and bloggers, as well as online freedom of speech for French citizens. If this bill becomes law, any French website could be shut down with nothing [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Next week will be decisive for BlackBerry corporate users. BlackBerry maker Research In Motion (RIM) could provide a solution to help security agencies in India access corporate email by obtaining encrypted data in readable formats. If RIM does not offer a solution before the end of the month, India has warned that it will block [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Although Saudi Arabia was one of the first countries to have been authorized to register domain names in Arabic, it is still one of the most repressive countries when it comes to the Internet. For example, since 2009 Internet cafes in the country have been required to install hidden cameras, supply a list of customers [...] more »