Clothilde Le Coz

Clothilde Le Coz has been working for Reporters Without Borders in Paris since 2007. She is now the Washington director for this organization, helping to promote press freedom and free speech around the world. In Paris, she was in charge of the Internet Freedom desk and worked especially on China, Iran, Egypt and Thailand. During the time she spent in Paris, she was also updating the "Handbook for Bloggers and Cyberdissidents," launched in 2005 by Reporters Without Borders. Her role is now to get the message out for readers and politicians to be aware of the constant threat journalists are submitted to in many countries.

by Clothilde Le Coz

The United States’ global reputation as a champion of free speech is at stake. This is partly because the legal framework has not kept pace with the evolution of free speech, and also because the Freedom of Information Act is not being applied correctly. Today, the U.S. is in danger of losing its place as [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

At least 80 people were killed during the latest clashes in Thailand. But the confusion and danger that are present in various parts of Bangkok do not explain why several Thai and foreign journalists have been shot since April. Two are dead. The tense political situation also doesn’t justify the leadership’s blocking of more than [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

In honour of the Expo Shanghai China, the biggest display of Chinese might since the 2008 Olympic Games, Reporters Without Borders is inviting Internet users to visit a page on its website, the “Garden of Freedoms,” that’s dedicated to the freedoms that are often oppressed in China. Hundreds of countries, regions and corporations are participating [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

On March 12, 2010, Reporters Without Borders celebrated World Day Against Cyber Censorship. The goal of the event was to rally everyone in support of a single Internet that is unrestricted and accessible to all. It is also meant to draw attention to the fact that, by creating new spaces for exchanging ideas and information, [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

The Turkish courts banned YouTube in May 2008, and now a new protest campaign launched by the editorial team of the Milliyet newspaper is drawing attention to how long the country has been prevented from using the website. The initiative, which was was launched on February 19, is not the first campaign of this type. [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Iranian authorities are once agan cracking down on the Internet. Internet connection speeds were degraded in several cities in advance of the Islamic Revolution’s 31st anniversary on February 2. This same tactic was previously used by the regime in advance of events likely to be used by the opposition to stage demonstrations. Several websites were [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Clothilde Le Coz just returned from Haiti, where she was part of a Reporters Without Borders mission. This is a special report about how Haitian media are responding to the disaster. The photos were taken by the author. In two weeks, Haiti will be forgotten by much of the world. After foreign media leave, which [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

2009 was an unprecedented year for online repression. For the first time since the Internet emerged as a tool for public use, there are currently 100 bloggers and cyber-dissidents imprisoned worldwide as a result of posting their opinions online in 2009, according to Reporters Without Borders. This figure is indicative of the severity of the [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

J.S. Tissainayagam As of December 10, J.S. Tissainayagam, a respected Tamil journalist and editor, had served the first 100 days of a 20-year sentence in a Sri Lankan jail. In his World Press Freedom Day statement, President Obama cited Tissainayagam as an “emblematic example” of a journalist who was being persecuted. Amnesty International also named [...] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Last week, the Iranian blogger Sasan Aghaei, who runs the site Azad Tribun, was arrested by intelligence ministry officials after they carried out a search of his Tehran home. It is not known where he was taken. Aghaei is also a reporter for the daily newspaper Farhikhteghan, and he’s the third employee of the paper [...] more »