Kathleen Bartzen Culver

Kathleen Bartzen Culver is an assistant professor in the School of Journalism & Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, teaching and researching at the intersection of ethics and digital media practices. Culver also serves as associate director of the Center for Journalism Ethics and Education Curator for PBS MediaShift.

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

When I first asked an educator friend to explain the Common Core standards to me, she said, “It boils down to agreements on what kids should learn and when.” Sounded simple to me. The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-based set of educational standards covering what children should learn in math and English [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

While I was opening this post and writing the headline above, six emails landed in my inbox. Not six pieces of junk, not six worthless spams. Six emails that needed actual attention and thought. Two of the six needed a reply, one prompted an addition to my calendar, one got filed and two hit the [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

I remember the exact moment I got sold on blended learning. My multimedia boot camp course met Monday mornings, most weeks with tech-based assignments due. My Sundays became increasingly bogged down with emails, instant message chats and even the occasional call as students wrestled the demons of HTML, video editing and page design. My husband [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

I have stopped using New York Times data visualizations in my training presentations to educators and students. Don’t get me wrong. They’re spectacular. This one setting winter Olympic event finishes to music completely changed my understanding of timed events. I learned about the nightmare of balancing the federal budget. And I figured out why World Cup [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

I rarely have to sell my students on what I’m teaching them. They’ve worked hard to get accepted into a highly competitive major, and they’re here because they want to learn. But that all changes when we get to my week on data. The grumbles and eyerolls abound. I feel like I can read some [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

When it comes to media work and the teaching of it, I loath the phrase, “the dark side.” It goes something like this: “You teach journalism and PR in the same department? I stay away from the dark side.” “You went from a newsroom to the dark side?” “You study branding and ethics? Didn’t know [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

The Poynter Institute just wrapped its fourth Teachapalooza, a conference for journalism educators who want to amp their multimedia skills and knowledge of current trends. The conference packed ideas, training and collaboration into a speedy three days for nearly 100 participants. I’ve been with the Poynter ‘Palooza since its inception, and I find it one [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

Visual journalism trainer and consultant Sara Quinn captures the action of Poynter’s latest educators seminar in one of her signature Quinn-fo-Graphics. Sara Quinn teaches and speaks about visual journalism, leadership and multimedia. She led Poynter’s college fellowship and its partnerships with universities for several years. Sara directed Poynter’s EyeTrack research of newspaper, tablet and online [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

Participants in Poynter’s latest Teachapalooza seminar for journalism educators used social media to share ideas, add examples and exchange jokes. Herbert Lowe from Marquette University captured the action in a Storify. [View the story "Journalism Education at #teacha14 @Poynter" on Storify] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

On Friday, June 6, our biweekly #EdShift chat will focus on how to avoid ethical minefields when using social media in news. We’ll cover questions of accuracy and verification, as well as inclusivity, participation and how to teach key principles in classes. The chat will be moderated as usual by MediaShift’s Education Curator Katy Culver, with special [...] more »