Meredith Broussard

Meredith Broussard teaches data journalism at Temple University.

by Meredith Broussard

Numeracy, or numerical literacy, is at the heart of data journalism. And if you are the kind of person who wants to become more numerate in order to do data journalism (maybe you’re a designer? A student? An inquisitive citizen?), one way to start is by thinking about a horse. Specifically, I’d like you to […] more »

by Meredith Broussard

“Yes, and…” is the closest thing improv comedy has to a cardinal rule. The rule goes like this: When the first performer says something, the next performer has to say “Yes, and…” instead of negating or dropping what the first performer said. It’s a powerful rule because it allows a comedy scene to go in […] more »

by Meredith Broussard

For the third installment of her Educational Thought Leader series, Arcadia University education professor Kira J. Baker-Doyle and I had a conversation about a data journalism project that uses big data to uncover inequality in Philadelphia public schools. Baker-Doyle is the author of The Networked Teacher: How New Teachers Build Social Networks for Professional Support. Our […] more »

by Meredith Broussard

Let’s say that you’re a historian in 2064 and you want to look at the New York Times for a view of how journalists represented celebrity fashion in the early 2000s. You could pull images of the pages of newsprint that hold Oscar photos, but what you’d really want is to see the Times’ 2014 […] more »

by Meredith Broussard

Remix is a new segment of education content on MediaShift, featuring interesting and innovative journalism assignments, courses and curricula. Writers will detail their ideas and work and, where possible, provide links and materials, so other educators can adapt them in their own programs. If you’re interested in sharing your approaches to be remixed at other […] more »

by Meredith Broussard

Making an introvert and an extrovert collaborate can be like plugging an extension cord into itself. Journalism professors see this in the classroom all the time: When an outgoing student gets paired with a shy student for a group assignment, the two students frequently don’t know how to talk to each other. They rush through […] more »