Mark Hannah

Mark Hannah is a political correspondent for Mediashift and a doctoral student at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication. Mark's political career began on the Kerry-Edwards presidential campaign, where he worked as a member of the national advance staff. He's more recently done advance work for the Obama-Biden campaign, the Presidential Inaugural Committee and the White House. In the "off-season" (i.e., in between campaigns) he worked in the PR agency world and conducted sensitive public affairs campaigns for well-known multinational corporations, major industry organizations and influential non-profits. He serves on the board of directors of the National Association for Media Literacy Education, is a member of the Public Relations Society of America and was a research fellow at the Society for New Communications Research. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and received a master's degree from Columbia University. His personal website is www.mark-hannah.com, and he can be reached at markphannah[at]gmail.com. Follow Mark on Twitter: @MarksTerritory.

by Mark Hannah

Just as the Personal Democracy Forum (PDF) was commencing last year, news broke that a young ex-CIA analyst working under contract for the National Security Agency in Hawaii disclosed reams of classified documents to the media. The leak was blasted by the Obama administration as a massive detriment to America’s national security and applauded by […] more »

by Mark Hannah

As the 2012 presidential campaigns intensify in the days leading up to the election, pollsters and pundits will be making frenzied attempts to grapple with the flood of information readily available on the Internet. What’s unclear is how effectively we’re using — and whether we’re being used by — that information.   Polling Let’s start […] more »

by Mark Hannah

With just minutes to go before last night’s second presidential debate, the folks over at PolitiFact.com sent out the following tweet: If you hear something during the #debate that you’d like us to fact-check, tweet it with #PolitiFactThis — PolitiFact (@politifact) October 17, 2012 Three hours later, after the dust had settled in the Hofstra […] more »

by Mark Hannah

We’ve been hearing a lot lately about alleged attempts to suppress voter turnout, as so-called “Voter ID” laws introduce new obstacles to voting that may thwart turnout (primarily among college students, minorities, and senior citizens). Amid this backdrop, and with the election just a month away, two advocacy groups have joined together to launch “The […] more »

by Mark Hannah

Last week, Google’s “Politics, Elections and Public Sector” team unveiled a “Four Screens to Victory” infographic that highlights new trends in how Americans gather political information. The folks at Google suggest that television may be losing its primacy in the world of campaign advertising, and they hope that political campaigns will begin to shift their ad […] more »

by Mark Hannah

NEW YORK — The famous Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei once wrote in a blog, “To express yourself needs a reason, but expressing yourself is a reason.” In the highly censored world of Chinese media, this sums up the growing consensus within that country — and around the world — that the freedom of […] more »

by Mark Hannah

Click to read the entire series As a political blogger and commentator, I try my best to stay up-to-the-minute with the most current campaign news. Working with the 24-hour television news format and instantaneous blogging platforms, it’s easy to get anxious that the information I have may be stale or incomplete. After all, I’ve been […] more »

by Mark Hannah

As I’ve read up online about the 2012 campaign news in recent months, I’ve noticed I’m doing a lot less, well, reading. I’ve checked around a bit and confirmed that websites that traditionally focus on text-based journalism — like Politico.com and NYTimes.com — are indeed ramping up their video offerings to add a new dimension […] more »

by Mark Hannah

Two years ago, the Supreme Court decided in Citizens United vs. the Federal Election Committee that unlimited political campaign spending by corporations and wealthy individuals was permissible under the First Amendment. To people who believed that moneyed interests already had an outsized influence on the electoral process, the decision was chilling. The ruling provided only […] more »

by Mark Hannah

As a teenager who was vocally opinionated about political issues, I often heard the cautionary refrain “Politics is not the topic of polite conversation.” That counsel must have been lost on me, since I find myself as an adult publicly airing my opinions as both the political correspondent for this blog and as a Democratic […] more »