Rachele Kanigel

Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University, where she advises Golden Gate Xpress, the student newspaper, and teaches reporting, writing, magazine and online journalism classes. She was a daily newspaper reporter for 15 years and has freelanced for magazines and websites. She has taught in or directed five summer study-abroad programs for the Institute for Education in International Media (ieiMedia). She is the author of The Student Newspaper Survival Guide. Follow her at @jourprof.

by Rachele Kanigel

When I walked into my media entrepreneurship class at San Francisco State University last week, I felt a little like a kindergarten teacher. Construction paper? Check. Toilet paper rolls? Check. Colored markers, scissors, glue sticks? Check, check, check. Pipe cleaners? Oh no! They were at home, in a shopping bag along with the pieces of [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

When Corey Ford was studying journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the late 1990s, he barely heard the word entrepreneurship. That was back in the day when journalists were told to steer clear of the business side and just stick to telling stories. “I definitely didn’t get anything remotely entrepreneurial [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

On the first day of most of my classes, I invite students to introduce themselves by describing their dream job. Without fail at least one — or sometimes two or three out of a class of 20 — will share their ambition to become a foreign correspondent. A photojournalism student fantasizes about capturing life in [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

“I hope I don’t throw up.” That was the response of one of my students a couple of weeks ago as she nervously prepared to give a presentation to five Bay Area magazine professionals and our department chair, who had agreed to serve as judges for my magazine publishing class’s Pitch Day. Luckily, she didn’t. [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

Teaching journalism in the 21st century is a little like packing a wardrobe for a month-long trip into a carry-on suitcase: You keep trying to squeeze one more thing into the bulging bag while praying that the zipper won’t burst. When I studied journalism in the 1980s at San Francisco State University, where I now [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

When Dan Gillmor was planning a five-day media entrepreneurship training program for journalism educators, he didn’t want participants to leave with merely a solid foundation in entrepreneurship principles and a new vocabulary of industry terms. In addition to learning about entrepreneurship, he wanted the participants to experience firsthand the emotional rollercoaster of the entrepreneurial process [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

After two decades of being pummeled by savvy tech companies that have stolen its readers, its advertisers and perhaps even its place as the leading media company in town, the San Francisco Chronicle has decided to fight innovation with innovation. The Hearst-owned newspaper is launching an off-site startup-style incubator designed to retrain and reinvigorate the [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

As a journalism professor at San Francisco State University in one of the most diverse cities in the world, I struggle to get my students to report outside their comfort zones. In my classes, I urge them to interview not just strangers, but people very much unlike themselves — older people, people with different politics, [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

When Adda Birnir joined the first class of the new entrepreneurial journalism program at the City University of New York in 2012, she thought she had a great idea for a new business: creating software that could optimize web content for a tablet. Four months later, Birnir launched her company, and it continues to this [...] more »

by Rachele Kanigel

In a rural province of Cambodia, a broadcast journalism student from California State University, Fullerton prepares a news report about an American medical missionary group that’s come to the village to provide medical and dental treatment. But the student, Joseph McHale, doesn’t just stand in front of the camera offering a dispassionate, objective account of [...] more »