Steven Davy

Steven Davy is the web content editor at The World, a BBC, WGBH, PRI co-production. He is also the developer of Exploring Conversations, a multimedia website examining the language of music. Steven has taught graduate and undergraduate students in social media and digital news reporting at Michigan State University. He is the politics correspondent for MediaShift. You can follow him @SDavy on Twitter.

by Steven Davy

Social Media content on MediaShift is sponsored by the John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships, a program offering innovative and entrepreneurial journalists the resources of Stanford University and Silicon Valley. Learn more here. Naheed Nenshi became mayor of Calgary at the end of October not by outspending his rivals or hailing from the incumbent political class […] more »

by Steven Davy

The experiments that took place with Facebook and Twitter during the 2008 presidential campaign are now viewed as standard operating procedure just two years later. Will the same be said about location-based services come 2012? Foursquare and Gowalla are the current crowned kings of geo-location and have been getting regular mentions in the tech blogosphere […] more »

by Steven Davy

A political campaign website is the place where candidates recruit new volunteers, and where the candidate can get their message out unfiltered. It’s more important than ever, and yet many candidates still struggle to get it right. “The website really is that first real encounter with the voter; it’s your chance to turn a casual […] more »

by Steven Davy

Search the name of Representative Pete Hoekstra of Michigan’s second district and PeteHoekstra.com is among the top results. But click on the site and you’ll encounter this tag line: “Dangerous, Polarizing & Bad for Michigan!” Rep. Pete Hoekstra How could a nine-term Congressman, a ranking member of the House Select Committee on Intelligence and now […] more »

by Steven Davy

The 2008 U.S. presidential campaign drew the attention of the world. In the aftermath, the Obama campaign’s use of Facebook, YouTube and Twitter were widely credited with helping secure the historic victory of President Barack Obama. But the Obama campaign wouldn’t have been able to make its technological strides without the innovations first deployed by […] more »

by Steven Davy

The importance of social media in politics was made clear by Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential run. But there is a new frontier of Web 2.0 technologies that politicians and political groups are slowly starting to embrace: the smartphone app. These apps have the potential to reshape how politicians communicate, raise money and get out the […] more »

by Steven Davy

Traditionally, newspaper reporters were dispatched to cover the mundane proceedings of a local government in action: the city council meeting. But as the mainstream media grapples with its survival in the Internet era, the seats in the audience once occupied by full-time reporters are sometimes being filled by local bloggers and other citizen media outfits. […] more »

by Steven Davy

If a present-day version of whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg was looking for a way to easily release important confidential information, he might find himself drawn to Posterous or its micro-blogging/lifestreaming competitor, Tumblr. These services have the potential to offer a new level of simplicity for releasing government information, and help open up the closed doors of […] more »

by Steven Davy

Last spring Emanuel Pleitez, 26, ran for California’s 32nd Congressional seat in a special election to replace Hilda Solis, the new secretary of labor. During the campaign, one of Pleitez’s opponents, California State Sen. Gil Cedillo, discovered photos from Pleitez’s Facebook profile that showed Pleitez hanging around with various women at parties. The Cedillo campaign […] more »

by Steven Davy

Politicians are figuring out what social media technologies like blogs, Facebook, MySpace and Twitter have to offer: direct access to voters. More than ever before, they can bypass the professional press and deliver an uncensored, unfiltered — and unchecked — message. Mayor Francis Slay “[Social media] allows me to gives my thoughts on the events […] more »