Sandra Ordonez

Sandra Ordonez is currently the Outreach Manager for OpenITP, part of the Open Technology Institute, that focuses on supporting the community behind anti-surveillance and anti-censorship technology. Ordonez calls herself a web astronaut who has been helping organizations navigate digital strategy and collaborative culture since the early 90's. She has conducted over 350 interviews on the future of journalism, and currently managed the New York chapter of Girls in Tech. Previously, she was the Communications Manager for Wikipedia. She graduated from American University with a double degree in International Relations and Public Relations.

by Sandra Ordonez

After a few minutes of talking to Noah Rosenberg, you are reminded of the 1920s journalist caricature that we have grown to love as a society. Fast-talking, witty, entrepreneurial, and passionate about people. However, one major difference stands out — his multimedia storytelling skills and geek power which he is using to tell the stories […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

Click to read the entire series The Internet’s reach is so pervasive, it feels as though it has always been around. The reality is that the web is still in its infancy, and we don’t really understand the risks it poses to our mental health. In fact, various experts, such as Larry D. Rosen, a […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

Click to read all SXSW coverage South by Southwest Interactive 2012 just finished, and in the last two days, the airports have been overwhelmed by geeks from all parts of the world with diverse gadgets, ironic T-shirts, and smartphones constantly in hand. This year was probably the biggest crowd the festival has ever seen, with […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

After almost two decades of working closely with diverse types of techs, I’ve slowly found myself transforming from a nice, sweet, agreeable person to “Saturday Night Live’s” Nick Burns, Your Company’s Computer Guy. What I have witnessed has not been pleasant — grown adults acting like 5-year-old children, and then blaming their techs for responding […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

Business content on MediaShift is sponsored by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, which offers an intensive, cutting edge, three semester Master of Arts in Journalism; a unique one semester Advanced Certificate in Entrepreneurial Journalism; and the CUNY J-Camp series of Continuing Professional Development workshops focused on emerging trends and skill sets in the industry. […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

While the behavior of connecting is nothing new, doing it in a virtual environment gives rise to new and sophisticated challenges — especially when you’re connecting across cultures. Knowing how to navigate these challenges is essential to community management. When I first discovered the Internet in 1996, I instantly fell in love. I was a bicultural, […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

David Shankbone is arguably the most influential new media photojournalist in the world. He has taken over 1,000 portraits of prominent people across a variety of fields for articles on Wikipedia.org and its foreign language equivalents. Because the pictures are copyleft — or free for reproduction, alteration, and distribution — they are used by numerous […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

Education content on MediaShift is sponsored by Carnegie-Knight News21, an alliance of 12 journalism schools in which top students tell complex stories in inventive ways. See tips for spurring innovation and digital learning at Learn.News21.com. This article was co-authored by Abby Moon. A previous article on MediaShift mined the OurBlook series of interviews with leading […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

OurBlook.com has been conducting an ongoing interview series on the current and future role of journalism and social media. In previous posts for PBS MediaShift, I shared some of the insights we’ve gathered about the future of journalism, and the skills that will be required of future journalists. In this installment, experts weigh on the […] more »

by Sandra Ordonez

A little over three years ago, I started working as the communications manager for Wikipedia. I had just moved to St. Petersburg, Fla., and was ecstatic to hear that this quirky website, which had begun to pop up in many of my web searches, was based there. Having grown up in New York, my culture […] more »