Tag: cpj

by Robert Mahoney

The murders of freelancers James Foley and Steven Sotloff last year put the news industry on the spot. What could news executives, press freedom groups and individual journalists do to improve safety? The issue was not new. International news organizations had been grappling with their responsibility towards freelancers and locally hired media workers for years. […] more »

by Tom Lowenthal

In a move unlikely to surprise those who access the Internet from mainland China, the country’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology recently blocked several popular tools used to bypass the “Great Firewall” national Internet censorship system. Citing the need to protect “cyberspace sovereignty” and to “maintain cyber security and steady operation,” the Ministry changed firewall […] more »

by Geoffrey King

This opinion piece originally appeared on the CPJ blog. The U.K. prides itself on its commitment to free expression, but the latest revelations of surveillance of journalists and calls by Britain’s prime minister, David Cameron, to ban secure messaging belie the country’s drift toward a more restrictive environment for the press. The revelations further underscore […] more »

by Jean-Paul Marthoz

This opinion piece first appeared on the Committee to Protect Journalists’ blog. The attack on the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo has sent shock waves through France and beyond. Not only because 12 people have been killed in cold blood and many were wounded in what was the deadliest terrorist attack in France since 1961, […] more »

by David Agren

Last month, photographs of a woman were posted on the Twitter account @Miut3 with an ominous message. “My life has come to an end today. Don’t put your families at risk like I did,” the tweet read. “I’m sorry. I died for nothing. They are closer on our trail than you think.” The woman depicted […] more »

by Geoffrey King

The following opinion piece originally appeared on the Committee to Protect Journalists’ Internet Channel. When President Obama takes the lectern to discuss U.S. surveillance policy, as he is expected to do Friday, those hoping for sweeping reform are likely to be disappointed. As reported in The New York Times, the president appears poised to reject […] more »

by Josh Stearns

The following is an opinion piece by correspondent Josh Stearns. It’s nearly impossible to gauge the full impact of harassment of the press. How do you measure the stories that go untold because a journalist felt intimidated? How do you quantify the corruption that won’t be exposed because sources are afraid to talk? When the […] more »

by Geoffrey King

The German magazine Der Spiegel reported recently that the U.S. National Security Agency hacked into the internal communication system of Al Jazeera. If the report is accurate, the targeted hacking of a news organization represents an assault on press freedom qualitatively different from — and in many ways more disquieting than — the perils posed […] more »

by Danny O'Brien

The Syrian civil war is also a propaganda war. With the Assad regime and the rebels both attempting to assure their supporters and the world that they are on the brink of victory, how the facts are reported has become central to the struggle. Hackers working in support of Assad loyalists this week decided to […] more »

by Danny O'Brien

Russia’s State Duma has passed a number of new laws in the past week, all seemingly aimed at reining in civil society and criticism of public figures. The bills would re-criminalize defamation and impose limits and labels on NGOs. They follow last month’s introduction of excessive fines for unauthorized protests. Government Crackdown Heightens One of […] more »