Tag: egypt

by Jillian C. York

This piece is co-authored by Trevor Timm. In its six years of existence, Twitter has staked out a position as the most free speech-friendly social network. Its utility in the uprisings that swept the Middle East and North Africa is unmatched, its usage by activists and journalists alike to spread news and galvanize the public […] more »

by Mark Glaser

How do people end up in the streets protesting something? What motivates them to take action, even when that action could lead to their arrest? Last year, Facebook and Twitter played major roles in helping organize street protests during the Arab Spring, to the point where dictators were focused on either blocking the services or […] more »

by Mark Glaser

Jillian York Welcome to the 38th episode of “The Mediatwits,” the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift’s Mark Glaser and Jillian York, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. First, we get a special on-the-ground report from special guest Mohamed El Dahshan in Tunisia, talking about a ruling expected from the country’s […] more »

by Tanja Aitamurto

This piece was co-written by Hanna Sistek. CAIRO — The revolution in Egypt is unfinished business. While new online tools are used to strengthen civil society, activists are still struggling with the digital divide when it comes to mobilizing masses against the army and the remains of the old administration. On a Saturday evening in […] more »

by Susannah Vila

Political satire is, historically, a great propeller of social movements. As Srdja Popovic, a leader of Optor, the Serbian resistance movement, said: Everything we did [had] a dosage of humor. Because I’m joking. You’re becoming angry. You’re always showing only one face. And I’m always again with another joke, with another action, with another positive […] more »

by Mark Glaser

Welcome to the second episode of “The Mediatwits,” the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift’s Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week’s show looks at the repercussions of the $39 billion buyout of T-Mobile USA by AT&T. Rafat has had both services and will stick […] more »

by Devin Harner

Perhaps it’s because I’ve got a Ph.D. in English and a background in print journalism, but when I consider the state of the press today, it brings to mind the poet John Keats’ idea of negative capability. In a letter he wrote to his brother in December 1817, Keats described the concept as “when man […] more »

by Jaron Gilinsky

This is the third of our on-the-ground reports from Cairo, Egypt, from Jaron Gilinsky. In this video report, Jaron considers the effects of social media on the Egyptian revolution. I wondered how Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak eventually knew about the hundreds of thousands of people in the streets calling for his resignation. Surely, he had […] more »

by Jaron Gilinsky

During the uprising that eventually ended the 30-year reign of President Hosni Mubarak, I became convinced that the most important journalistic work being done today is in those countries where journalists are not wanted. Mubarak and his agents were determined to silence the protesters and their message. But, thanks to the valiant efforts of journalists […] more »

by Jaron Gilinsky

CAIRO, EGYPT — I have been following the Egyptian pro-democracy blog, Rantings of a Sandmonkey, for years now. I have long wondered about the identity of its author, who describes himself as “a micro-celebrity, blogger, activist, new media douchebag, pain in the ass!” on his blog. I contacted him several times on previous trips to […] more »