Tag: freedom of press

by Geoffrey King

The German magazine Der Spiegel reported recently that the U.S. National Security Agency hacked into the internal communication system of Al Jazeera. If the report is accurate, the targeted hacking of a news organization represents an assault on press freedom qualitatively different from — and in many ways more disquieting than — the perils posed […] more »

by Simon Roughneen

KUALA LUMPUR — On Feb. 17, Malaysia’s still-influential former Prime Minister Mahithir Mohamed weighed in on an ongoing debate about freedom of the press in Malaysia, a rising Southeast Asian economy. “Frankly I would rather have the government censoring me … [I]f I don’t like what the government is doing, I can work for the […] more »

by Shawn Crispin

Cyberattacks on news websites and apparent government hacking into journalists’ email accounts have raised new questions about the integrity of media reforms in Burma. The New York Times reported earlier this month that several journalists who regularly cover Burma-related news recently received warning messages from Google that their email accounts may have been hacked by […] more »

by Simon Roughneen

PENANG — “Reactionary group leader sentenced to life in jail” ran the headlines in Vietnam’s government-linked press earlier this week. Such coverage sheds light on how the media works in the one-party state where online writing has filled a void. In state-run mainstream media, topics such as power struggles within the ruling Communist Party and […] more »

by Lillo Montalto Monella

Ten years after the wave of social unrest that set the streets of Buenos Aires on fire, the Argentine government is toughening state control over information made available to the public. “As Argentina enters a period of increasing economic uncertainty, having greater power over the media will allow the government to better control information available […] more »

by Jonathan Peters

Since the 1970s, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has regulated indecency in broadcast programming. It has enforced laws that prohibit broadcasters from airing, at least during certain hours, any “patently offensive” sexual or excretory material. And since the 1970s, broadcast outlets have attacked the FCC for doing so. They’ve challenged the agency’s authority, as well […] more »

by Hanna Sistek

This post was co-authored by Tanja Aitamurto CAIRO — The historic revolution in Egypt this spring changed the country’s media landscape dramatically. Since the uprising, a plethora of new online initiatives have sprung up. Several citizen journalists have become full-on celebrities. News agencies have started disseminating on Facebook. New TV channels are aired. Salma el […] more »

by Simon Roughneen

BANGKOK — A handful of protestors gathered outside the Burmese embassy in Bangkok last Friday to vent their anger against the detention of 17 journalists in Burma, some of whom have been given multiple-decade jail terms for what activists describe as “no more than doing their jobs.” The jailed reporters worked for Democratic Voice of […] more »

by Dina Tariq

The U.S. government pumped an estimated half a billion dollars into revitalizing Iraq’s news media after Saddam Hussein was ousted in 2003. It was the first time in three decades that Iraqi citizens had access to a free press, but the current state of news media in the multiparty republic is not what some had […] more »