Tag: freedom of speech

by Julie Keck

1. After Twitter ban, Turkey’s netizens find YouTube blockage a breeze (Fercan Yalinkilic / Wall Street Journal) 2. ‘Why newspapers should steer away from the MTV model’ (Pat Long / Journalism.co.uk) 3. The pay-per-visit debate: Is chasing viral traffic hurting journalism? (Mary Clare Fischer / American Journalism Review) 4. Twitter’s brevity is its biggest strength […] more »

by Parker Higgins

The blogging platform WordPress.com has taken the unusual — and welcome — step of going to court to defend its users against bogus copyright claims aimed at silencing their speech on the platform. Automattic, WordPress’s parent company, has joined two separate lawsuits that seek to hold the would-be censors of legitimate lawful speech accountable for […] more »

by Amy Hong

After the death of Hugo Chavez was announced this week, individuals across the globe — from everyday Venezuelans to Barack Obama to Billy Bragg — took to the Twitterverse to comment on the late Latin American leader’s passing. Some mourned his death, while others expressed vehement support or outright rejection of his political ideologies. This […] more »

by Simon Roughneen

PENANG — “Reactionary group leader sentenced to life in jail” ran the headlines in Vietnam’s government-linked press earlier this week. Such coverage sheds light on how the media works in the one-party state where online writing has filled a void. In state-run mainstream media, topics such as power struggles within the ruling Communist Party and […] more »

by Simon Roughneen

RANGOON, Burma — It is a sign of the times that a journalist in Burma is writing about a freedom of expression clampdown in a neighboring country. With around 80 political prisoners freed in another amnesty on September 17 and with new Information Minister Aung Kyi announcing that the recently formed country’s press council would […] more »

by Will Creeley

Today’s college students enjoy the ability to speak their minds in unprecedented ways. Powered by omnipresent high-speed Internet access, students may sound off at all hours via a sparkling array of online outlets: Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, email, instant messaging, and blogs, just to name a few. The ancient among us — by which I […] more »

by Simon Roughneen

BANGKOK — As a high profile case against a prominent media campaigner returns to court in Bangkok, it has emerged that the long arm of Thailand’s lèse-majesté law has reached into California. On Thursday Chiranuch Premchaiporn of the Thai current affairs website Prachatai returned to court in the Thai capital to face vague-sounding allegations that […] more »

by Laid Zaghlami

The Maghreb is generally a term used to refer to five countries in North Africa: Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia. This article explores the current state of the media in the region, and marks the effect that a burgeoning citizen media sphere is having on democracy. It is based on a contribution by the […] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Click here to read all the year-end roundups Despite some good PR for online freedom this year, online censorship grew and became more subtle in 2010. Online propaganda remains strong within countries like China and Iran, where media censorship is everywhere and the governments have mastered online censorship tools. These countries are as efficient as […] more »

by Mark Glaser

It’s holiday time, and that means travel mania, less work and yes, year-end roundups. Yes, they are the lazy way to finish out the year for journalists and bloggers around the world, the ultimate in traffic catnip. But we thought we could take a different approach, doing year-end roundups for each niche we cover at […] more »