Tag: human rights

by Madeleine Bair

Four years ago, a police killing in rural Buckfield, Jamaica was caught on camera and uploaded to YouTube. The fatal shooting of a man who was laying on the ground, surrounded by a crowd, with no visible weapons but the rocks at his side, made headlines in Jamaica and unmasked the lies in the police department’s […] more »

by Christoph Koettl

When I started working on human rights crises seven years ago, a promising and groundbreaking way to monitor violations were satellite images. The idea seemed simple enough: a single sensor in space taking pictures of inaccessible conflict zones, such as Darfur. Opening my laptop today in 2014, I have thousands of sensors at my fingertips, […] more »

by Madeleine Bair

“Say hi to your mom,” a young bully says to the 15-year-old boy his posse has surrounded on a park bench. “You will be an Internet celebrity.” The chilling taunt comes 4 minutes into a 20-minute Russian YouTube video of homophobic harassment that went viral last week. It is the most chilling reminder that as […] more »

by Julie Keck

1. Twitter fakes real users’ tweets to promote ad platform (SFGate) 2. The rise of the personal franchise site in news (Pressthink) 3. Is Flipboard a partner or competitor for publishers and content creators? Yes (GigaOm) 4. The sad story of Platform, Facebook’s gigantic missed opportunity (PandoDaily) 5. Reddit rolls out its front page-changing multireddit […] more »

by Madeleine Bair

In November, one video caught the attention of international observers, news outlets, and criminal prosecutors. It’s the type of video whose images have altered the discussion on the Syrian conflict, and may also revolutionize the role of citizen video in times of war. The scene takes place in an open-walled building off a main road […] more »

by Sam Gregory

When you hear the phrase “cameras everywhere” your first thought may be of ubiquitous surveillance cameras, watching your every move on behalf of the state, private businesses and corporations. On second thought it may conjure up the hundreds of millions of cameras, mobile and Internet connections in the hands of ordinary citizens who are filming, […] more »

by Clothilde Le Coz

Although Saudi Arabia was one of the first countries to have been authorized to register domain names in Arabic, it is still one of the most repressive countries when it comes to the Internet. For example, since 2009 Internet cafes in the country have been required to install hidden cameras, supply a list of customers […] more »

by Katie Donnelly

Last month, Jessica Clark and I explored how various Public Media 2.0 projects are measuring their level of success in informing and engaging publics. We found that many public media organizations are struggling to measure impact — and some are relying only on traditional indicators of reach, as opposed to other elements of impact such […] more »

by Susannah Vila

When the 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Doctors Without Borders had 1,300 followers on Twitter. Now, it boasts over 13,000. The Red Cross follower count shot up by just over 40,000 people in the weeks following the quake. If technology wasn’t already transforming the public role of the non-governmental organization, it has now brought […] more »

by Mina Martin

This is a special report for MediaShift from the person who set up a clandestine FM radio broadcast in Beijing to protest censorship. The correspondent is associated with Reporters Without Borders, but is writing under the pseudonym “Mina Martin” for fear of retribution from the Chinese government. You can hear the 20-minute broadcast in English, […] more »