Tag: ijnet

by Margaret Looney

Journalism changes at a rapid speed, and universities struggle to keep pace. The system for updating curricula is often so bureaucracy-laden that by the time a new journalism tool or skill makes it into the classroom, the next big thing has already been trending on Twitter for months. In an effort to bridge this gap, […] more »

by Phillip Smith

At the end of nine exhausting yet exhilarating days spent in three Venezuelan cities, I watched 30 journalists present the start of at least eight different data journalism projects seeking to answer important questions about the country’s challenges. Given what I saw in those presentations, it is going to be an exciting time for data […] more »

by Margaret Looney

It’s no surprise that social media are on the rise. For example, 59 percent of journalists across 15 countries use Twitter in 2013, compared to 47 percent last year, according to the Oriella Digital Journalism Study. The more that journalists use social media, the more tools pop up to help them search multiple platforms at […] more »

by Jennifer Dorroh

South America is home to the world’s largest rainforest, its greatest river, and some of its most challenging environmental problems, from pollution to deforestation. Yet environmental issues are often overlooked by the region’s media, says environmental journalist and mapping expert Gustavo Faleiros. “In South America, environmental coverage is always a second-class issue. It only gets covered […] more »

by Maite Fernandez

As the media landscape continues to shift, traditional news outlets are trimming or eliminating specialized reporting, including science coverage. In Spain, a new website wants to not only fill that void, but to become the go-to science publication in the Spanish-speaking world. Launched last year, Materia is devoted to science, environment, health and technology. And […] more »

by Valentina Giménez

Pressure from the publishing industry has weakened the watchdog role of journalists, turning them into lapdogs at the service of corporations and politicians and unable to serve their readers. That’s one of the conclusions of Bernardo Diaz Nosty, journalism professor at the University of Malaga. Diaz Nosty, also a journalist, is the author of “Libro […] more »