Tag: journalism

by Jenny Shank

This summer The Onion ran a satirical piece purporting to be an op-ed by CNN’s managing editor, Meredith Artley, titled, “Let Me Explain Why Miley Cyrus’ VMA Performance Was Our Top Story This Morning.” Her explanation for why CNN filled the top news slot with the story “Miley Cyrus Did What???” (this was the actual […] more »

by Stephen J. A. Ward

Ironically, journalists -— a group normally reluctant to theorize —- are today up to their ears in definitions, a favorite activity of philosophers. For some time, journalists and their associations have been trying anxiously to define “journalist” and “journalism” as a media revolution blurs the differences between professional journalists and citizens. I have some bad […] more »

by Stephen J. A. Ward

This an opinion post by correspondent Stephen Ward. Transparency, according to optimistic accounts, is the answer to bad government and wrongdoing by corporations and news media. Let the “sunshine” of transparency enter the public domain and watch these evil forces retreat. Transparency — monitoring how agencies operate — goes back to the trumpeting of “publicity” […] more »

by Ryan Frank

I have a confession: I was part of the problem for American newspapers. In 2005, I had just started covering City Hall, and I felt like my newspaper career had taken off. I covered people in suits walking fast through an important building. I measured my success by how many times I landed on the […] more »

by Amy Schmitz Weiss

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have become a hot topic this year in the press. It seems on a daily basis there is some article or blog post talking about the latest MOOC platform, MOOC course being offered or debate surrounding the issue regarding this type of learning. It should be no surprise that the […] more »

by Sisi Wei, ProPublica

Journalists can learn a lot from videogames. Games can help players explore unfamiliar worlds and experience stories, almost literally, through the eyes of another person. Designed well, videogames guide players to feel emotion and conflict, as well as learn the intricacies of complex subjects and systems. They engage users in a highly meaningful, memorable and […] more »

by Gary Kebbel

The start of classes this fall will also bring renewed debate about what journalism and mass communications colleges should teach in an age of disruption. Professors are trying to figure out how we should be preparing students for jobs that don’t exist yet. Or for jobs that will exist in two years, but won’t in […] more »

by Zach C. Cohen

Digital disruption has changed the landscape of the media world, and journalism and communication schools need to figure out how to educate in a time of vast change. The schools themselves need to change too, or risk falling behind. As part of this week’s special “Back to J-School 2013,” in-depth report at MediaShift, this episode […] more »

by Stephen J. A. Ward

Talk of media revolution is so ubiquitous that we sometimes become inured to the force of what we say. We nod our head in agreement that change is everywhere, but we fail to think through the consequences of change. During my public talks, I note that many people accept the fact of media revolution but […] more »

by Courtney Lowery Cowgill

This month, throngs of fresh-eyed students are filing back onto campus (or logging in online), attempting to become journalists at a time when the very definition of a journalist is in constant flux. Those who teach tomorrow’s journalists have a monumental task ahead of them: Not only do they have to instruct and mentor these […] more »