Tag: law

by Rob Arcamona

Click here to read the whole series This piece is co-authored by Jeff Hermes and Andy Sellars. This year turned out to be one that could fit well in a Billy Joel song: peppered protesters, jailed journalists, Internet crusaders … the list goes on. To recap a year that has been chock-full of shifts in [...] more »

by Rob Arcamona

On November 13, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s website, StLToday, asked readers to comment on a story titled, “What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever eaten?” Soon, a commenter posted a reply that included a “vulgar, two-syllable word for a part of a woman’s anatomy,” according to an online account by Kurt Greenbaum, the paper’s director of [...] more »

by Jeffrey D. Neuburger

Journalists and news outlets are accustomed to offering comments and criticisms about others, but they’re not as used to being the subject of public comment themselves. In the online world, where technology can and does upend established relationships, journalists and online news outlets are joining the ranks of the commented-upon. The shift has taken place [...] more »

by Jeffrey D. Neuburger

The news is information, and information wants to be free, as the saying goes. But for news organizations, the news is a product that is collected, recorded and sold for profit. And those profits are now under extreme economic pressure, threatening some news organizations with extinction. Both online and traditional news outlets are regrouping, retrenching [...] more »

by Jeffrey D. Neuburger

In 1998, the U.S. Congress enacted the Child Online Protection Act (COPA), a law intended to control child access to sexually explicit material on the Internet. The law was immediately challenged on free speech and other grounds and its enforcement was delayed. After ten years of litigation, on January 22 the U.S. Supreme Court dealt [...] more »

by Jeffrey D. Neuburger

Jeffrey D. Neuburger Book publishers can be sued if they publish a book full of libelous statements because, the reasoning goes, a publisher should know what it prints. The publisher reviews the manuscript, edits and proofreads it, and distributes the finished book to retailers. It is involved in every part of the process. But the [...] more »

by Jennifer Woodard Maderazo

Earlier this year, there was a debate in journalism circles and in the general public about who could be considered a journalist, as San Francisco videoblogger and media maker Josh Wolf was jailed after refusing to turn over video footage to federal authorities. After spending 226 days in jail, Wolf was dubbed the “longest-jailed journalist [...] more »

by Mark Glaser

The community-generated news site, Digg, has been an experimental hothouse for online communities. Last summer, there was the move by Netscape to offer to pay top Diggers to do their news-article bookmarking at Netscape, with Digg CEO Jay Adelson saying he’d never pay Digg community members. Now comes the user revolt after Digg decided to [...] more »

by Mark Glaser

Judging by the sturm und drang roiling the blogosphere and media circles, you’d think that Viacom’s $1 billion lawsuit against Google’s YouTube is the epic confrontation of old media vs. new, of suits vs. hipsters, of DRM vs. free love, of greed vs. good. It may well be all those things, but it will not [...] more »

by Mark Tapscott

Mark Glaser is away on vacation this week, but we’re happy to have Mark Tapscott filling in as a guest blogger. Tapscott is editorial page editor of The Washington Examiner, proprietor of Tapscott’s Copy Desk blog and the Distinguished Journalism Fellow at The Heritage Foundation. Glaser will return here next Monday, Oct. 9. Among the [...] more »