Tag: press freedom

by Josh Stearns

According to the Supreme Court, police need a warrant to search the cell phones of people they arrest. The unanimous decision, which was handed down last week, is being heralded as a major victory for privacy rights and a landmark case with implications far beyond cell phones. The New York Times reports, “The ruling almost certainly [...] more »

by Geoffrey King

Google has taken its first public steps to comply with a troubling ruling by the European Court of Justice establishing a so-called “right to be forgotten” throughout the European Union. The ruling, on May 13, requires that search companies consider individuals’ demands to remove Internet links that reference them, and to give those requests priority over the [...] more »

by Julie Keck

1. Nielsen fleshes out Twitter TV ratings with demographic data (Ryan Faughnder / Los Angeles Times) 2. Netflix’s Neil Hunt says personalized recommendations will replace the navigation grid (Anthony Ha / TechCrunch) 3. First Look Media will give $550,000 to support press freedoms (Kristen Hare / Poynter) 4. Jezebel’s Anna Holmes lands at Fusion (Peter [...] more »

by Tim Karr

Saturday, May 3 was World Press Freedom Day. The following is a guest post from FreePress to mark the day. “If you want to liberate a society,” Egyptian Arab Spring activist Wael Ghonim said early in the year, “just give them the Internet.” In retrospect, Ghonim should have qualified his statement to include the kind [...] more »

by Jose Gonzalez

The death of Canadian freelance photographer Ali Mustafa while documenting the Syrian civil war illustrates the persistent problem of the safety of journalists in the country and, increasingly, the particular threats faced by freelance journalists reporting in one of the most dangerous locations on the planet. Much of the reporting that has come out of Syria in recent months [...] more »

by Marianna Tzabiras

Will Burma’s reforms lead to substantial change? That question has been repeatedly asked since the political initiatives taken in 2011 were seen as steering the country towards democracy and away from its history of military rule. Three years later, assessments of Burma’s progress vary, especially around media freedom and free expression. On a recent visit [...] more »

by Geoffrey King

In less than a week, Turkish voters will cast their ballots in local elections widely seen as a test of support for embattled Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who has faced growing questions about official corruption since a high-level probe first became public in December. Although many observers believe Erdoğan will survive the current political crisis, the prime [...] more »

by Julie Keck

1. Apple in talks with Comcast about streaming-TV service (Shalini Ramachandran, Daisuke Wakabayashi & Amol Sharma / Wall Street Journal) 2. Slate to introduce a variation on the pay wall (Leslie Kaufman / New York Times) 3. Nilay Patel, no longer managing editor of The Verge, moves to Vox.com (Kara Swisher / Re/code) 4. Chuck [...] more »

by Jillian C. York

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) released its annual “Enemies of the Internet” index last week — a ranking first launched in 2006 intended to track countries that repress online speech, intimidate and arrest bloggers and conduct surveillance of their citizens. Some countries have been mainstays on the annual index, while others have been able to work their way off the list. Two [...] more »

by Hiba Zayadin

Car bombs. Suicide attacks. Assassinations. These words are too often attached to any mention of Iraq these days. The reported death toll in this war-torn country reached over 1,000 in January 2014 alone. Journalists have been, and continue to be, among the casualties. In the first of 2014, Firas Mohammed Attiyah, a 28-year-old freelance reporter [...] more »