Tag: teaching

by Steve Blank

Two of the hot topics in education in the last few years have been Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC’s) and the flipped classroom. I’ve been experimenting with both of them. What I’ve learned (besides being able to use the word “pedagogy” in a sentence) is 1) Assigning students lectures as homework doesn’t guarantee the students will [...] more »

by Jan Schaffer

So far, two cohort groups, some 21 people, have gone through my Seminar in Media Entrepreneurship for mid-career professionals. It is the first seminar that each cohort group takes as they embark on the 20-month, 10-course journey to a Master of Arts in Media Entrepreneurship (MAME) at American University’s School of Communication (SOC). As entrepreneurship [...] more »

by Kathleen Bartzen Culver

Every semester in my introductory course in the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s journalism school, I ask the students to introduce themselves and tell me their dream job. I get my fair share of professional athlete or Broadway star. But in the last few years, I’ve heard what feels like an increasing number of dreams the journalism [...] more »

by Zach C. Cohen

How will we teach the next generation of the journalists? Such is the question raised in PBS MediaShift’s “Back to J-School” special, and we want you to help us find out. Will J-schools flip the curriculum, focusing more on digital skills than journalism basics? Will they flip the classroom, moving most learning online and turning [...] more »

by Aran Levasseur

According to the ancient Greeks, humans received the gift of fire from the Titan, Prometheus. Paleoanthropologists have unearthed evidence that our early ancestor, homo erectus, was able to control fire around 400,000 years ago. Whether looking through the lens of myth or science the analysis is similar: Controlling fire was a watershed event in human [...] more »

by Tina Barseghian

The promise of technology in the pursuit of learning is vast — and so are the profits. The Software & Information Industry Association valued the U.S. ed-tech market at $7.5 billion in 2010. With daily launches of new products promising to solve all manner of problems — from managing classrooms to engaging bored students with [...] more »

by Paul Barnwell

I remember plenty of seven-digit numbers from my youth — the Gabrielli’s home phone, the Young’s, and the Bardo’s among them. I probably had about 20 numbers cataloged in my 12-year-old brain. I remember memorizing directions to ride my bike to various swimming holes in Concord, N.H., including the old train bridge spanning the Merrimack [...] more »

by Sarah Butrymowicz

Surrounded by farmland and ranches, Colorado’s Edison School sits off an unpaved road, with tumbleweeds blowing across its dirt parking lot. As recently as a few years ago, many families relied on solar or wind power instead of electricity; today, many still haul home their water from wells. Principal Rachel Paul estimates that 25-30 percent [...] more »

by Tina Barseghian

I’ve heard arguments from ed tech experts about how using technology for learning may in fact deepen the divide between wealthy and low-income kids. Students who have access to technology and are encouraged by teachers and parents to leverage it for new ways of learning, the argument goes, will leap even further ahead than low-income [...] more »

by Alexa Capeloto

“Beyond J-School 2011” is sponsored by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, which offers an intensive, cutting edge, three semester Master of Arts in Journalism; a unique one semester Advanced Certificate in Entrepreneurial Journalism; and the CUNY J-Camp series of Continuing Professional Development workshops focused on emerging trends and skill sets in the industry. This [...] more »