Women’s Work and Sex Work in Nineteenth-Century America

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In this blog post, Anya Jabour, Ph.D., examines how the vast majority of self-supporting women continued to eke out an existence in the Civil War era.

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Mourning in the Civil War Era

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In this blog post, Anya Jabour, Ph.D., reveals how most Americans in the Civil War era struggled to maintain familiar mourning rituals in death’s aftermath.

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Military Service and Manhood in the Civil War Era

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In this blog post, Anya Jabour, Ph.D., reveals how for many young men, joining the Confederate army was an important coming of age ritual, a marker of both manhood and adulthood.

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For Freedom and Family

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In this blog post, Anya Jabour, Ph.D. provides historical background on the "contrabands" of the Civil War South.

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Corsets, Crinolines, and the Civil War: The Politics of Women’s Fashions

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Anya Jabour, Ph.D., has been teaching and researching the history of women, families and children in the 19th-century South for more than 20 years. She is Professor of History at the University of Montana. In her first blog post, Jabour explores the history of Civil War-era fashion and why women of that time wore hoopskirts.

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From Southern Ladies to She-Rebels

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Anya Jabour, Ph.D., teaches and researches the history of women, families and children in the 19th-century South. In this blog post, Jabour dives deeper into Emma Green’s “rebelliousness” and provides context into changes in traditional definitions of southern femininity for many white women in the Civil War South.

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