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Jerry Miller and the Innocence Project
Jerry Miller, Photo by Robin Holland
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May 4, 2007

Jerry Miller served 25 years behind bars for a crime he didn't commit. When Jerry Miller was 22, he was picked up by police after an officer said he resembled a sketch of a Chicago rapist. Based on that misidentification, Miller was convicted and served 25 years before being released last year on parole, forced to register as a sex-offender.

Today, Miller represents the 200th person exonerated by post-conviction DNA testing, with the help of the Innocence Project: "a national litigation and public policy organization dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted people through DNA testing and reforming the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice."

"I can't help that it happened. You know what I'm saying? That it happened, that's uncontrollable. But to make it out of it, that's the blessing, you know. To survive it." Miller explained in his interview with Bill Moyers.

The Innocence Project was founded in 1992 by Barry C. Scheck and Peter J. Neufeld at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University.

"It's impossible to put ourselves in his shoes, but we all have a moral obligation to learn from these exonerations and prevent anyone else from enduring this tragedy," said Peter Neufeld, Co-Director of the Innocence Project.

Read a special blog essay by Barry Scheck.

References and Reading:
Meet the 200
Learn more about the 200 people exonerated through DNA evidence by The Innocence Project

"The Exonerated: In Their Own Words"
Watch the stories of three others exonerated by the Innocence Project.

Suspect Implicated by DNA That Cleared Miller
Possley, Maurice. "Officials: DNA that cleared one man implicates another in '81 rape," CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 23, 2007.

Read the 'Justice for all Act'
This Act passed by Congress in 2004 raised the amount of damages compensation for those wrongfully accused an exonerated to $100,000 a year for each year of incarceration, and $50,000 a year for each year in prison for those not on death row. This law applies to federal cases only (though it urges states to do the same), and 28 states have no compensation statutes.

Learn more about other DNA exoneration organizations in your state.

NOW WITH BILL MOYERS: American Prisons in Perspective

Photo by Robin Holland

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Bill Moyers sits down with Carlo Bonini, Italy's foremost investigative reporter, on his role in uncovering the "yellowcake" forgeries prominent in Iraq pre-war intelligence.

JERRY MILLER AND THE INNOCENCE PROJECT
Jerry Miller, recently exonerated after 24 years in prison by DNA evidence, discusses how he remained positive amidst the most negative of circumstances.

JONATHAN MILLER
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